Why does the myth of 110 VAC persist into the present day?

People who should know better still persist in using the term *110 volts*.
If my line voltage were 110 VAC, I would bitch like crazy to the power
company. The standard in the USA has not been 110 V for at least 50 years.
Bill
Reply to
Repeating Rifle
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1) SOME of use remember 50 years ago.
2) I still haven't gotten used to the 117 volt "standard."
Reply to
John Gilmer
We continuously monitor line voltage in our relay repair facility, and it can range from 105 to 132. If we summed and averaged, our standard would be about 115 V.
Reply to
Pablo
On Sun, 14 Dec 2003 21:02:48 -0800, Repeating Rifle wrote (in message ):
It's one less syllable?
Call it what you want. Mains voltage has never been "standard" anything.
Reply to
DaveC
On Mon, 15 Dec 2003 08:02:43 -0500, "John Gilmer" Gave us:
Most products have defined ranges of acceptable power voltages.
Some of our stuff works from 85 to 265 in an autoswitched AC line in circuit.
Most of ou=r stuff is rated from 105 to some other voltage.
Reply to
DarkMatter
in article snipped-for-privacy@4ax.com, DarkMatter at snipped-for-privacy@thebarattheendoftheuniverse.org wrote on 12/15/03 12:36 PM:
If you make incandescant lamps that do that, I would like to buy some.
Bill
Reply to
Repeating Rifle
Ow! that's ugly. I carried a Dranitz recorder around for years and we consistantly saw a range of 121-125 in SW Florida if they didn't have the site related problems I was trying to find. I monitor it at my house (on a 20a dedicated computer circuit) and it is very stable around 122-124. There are 3 houses on my transformer.
Reply to
Greg
Well, you are too late! The standard for the power system is 120 volt. Equipment ratings can be lower.
Ben Miller
Reply to
Ben Miller
ANSI Std C84.1-1995, Electric Power Systems and Equipment - Voltage Ratings (60 Hertz), is sort of a 'treaty' between electric utilities and appliance manufacturers. For Nominal System Voltage of 120, it lists 110 as Minimum Utilization Voltage and 126 as Maximum Utilization Voltage [for range-A tolerance.] Corresponding Equipment Nameplate Voltage Rating in the standard is 115 or 120, with motors and motorized-HVAC equipment, 115.
--s falke
Reply to
s falke
Actually, it seems to me the better question is, "Why is '220' still used so much? I hear mostly 120 and seldom 110, mostly 480 and seldom 440, but mostly 220 instead of 240. What do others hear in their practices? --Phil
Repeat> People who should know better still persist in using the term *110
Reply to
Phil Munro
Typically I would say homeowners say 220, appliance salesmen say 230 and electrical professionals say 240. YMMV
Reply to
Greg
Canadian Electrical Code (23rd edition) Section 8, subsection 100: "When calculating currents that will result from loads, ................................ voltage divisors shall be 120, 208, 240, 277, 347, 416, 480, or 600 as applicable." Russell
Reply to
Russell
There's one now ;-)
Reply to
Greg
Because it allows them to sell light bulbs that burn out REALLY quick on 124 V mains!
Jon
Reply to
Jon Elson
I see 24v, 120v, 208v, 240
Reply to
sloan van mierlo

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