Gold From Filter Feeders

Ingesting calcium from oyster shell suppliments is supposedly unhealthy from the high lead levels. Filter feeders concentrate the
heavy metal in their shell.
Now, to be sure, Pb is more reactive than Au and the concentration is much higher in many oyster beds.
Moreover, years ago I calculated the cost of energy to pump water through a fat short pipe and it came out to be worth more than the gold in the same amount of seawater.
But times change. The entire world is wired so the credit crisis ain't gonna be "solved" by a 1930s style Great Depression + killing 50 million in a world war. Instead they are gonna have to go the inflation route. (Sorry, Bernanke, well trimmed facial hair will only get you so far.)
Gold will soon be worth $2K/oz.
Is anyone working on this?
If sea water doesn't work I know where to get lots of water with much higher concentrations of gold.
You might want to get your seafood somewhere else, however.
Bret Cahill
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Dear Bret Cahill:

...
Shellfish don't concentrate gold. Cadmium, lead, mercury, virus, sure. Wrong chemistry.
David A. Smith
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Maybe they can gene splice a zebra mussel with the right chemistry.
Bret Cahill
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On Mon, 10 Nov 2008 09:22:47 -0800 (PST),

There isn't enough gold in seawater. Gold is estimated to be about 10 parts per trillion. That means that you've have to filter 250,000 tonnes of seawater for an ounce of gold. Lets say an oyster was a pipe 10cm^2, you'd need to filter a column 25,000,000 m long. The gulf stream flows at as high as 2.5m/s. So that's 10Ms, or about 4 months. That's the theoetical minimum assuming 100% extraction. If you've got a bed of oysters then some will inevitably end up filtering the sea water that has already passed through another.
Uranium, OTOH, is not far from being commercially expoitable from seawater. U is about 3ppb, about 300x more common than gold. It currently trades at around 60USD/kg, part of the reason the price is so low is because of existing weapons stockpiles fulfilling a lot of the demand for fissile materials. But at $200/kgU it would probably be break-even for extraction from seawater.
What do you want gold for anyway? Other than electronics and jewelry I cannot think of another major demand where gold is "consumed".
Tim.
--
God said, "div D = rho, div B = 0, curl E = - @B/@t, curl H = J + @D/@t,"
and there was light.
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Dear Tim Woodall:

...
...
A fast buck / future income.
David A. Smith
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On Mon, 10 Nov 2008 11:21:40 -0800 (PST),

People are only going to extract minerals from seawater when it's commercially viable. Last article I saw on U extraction they were talking about $1bn for the extraction plant. As well as being much more abundant, it's easier to find things that will react or bind with uranium.
I'd expect that the price of gold would be lower than the cost of extracting gold from seawater. If it ever rises to the extraction costs then I'd expect it not to go much higher. I really can't see gold extracted from seawater as ever having a significant financial value over and above what it costs to extract.
Tim.
--
God said, "div D = rho, div B = 0, curl E = - @B/@t, curl H = J + @D/@t,"
and there was light.
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dlzc wrote:

Fast is correct, in one hand and out the other before you even get to count it. Obama-nomics. its coming!
http://webpages.charter.net/jamie_5 "
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"The search for gold has impoverished more European nations . . ."
-- DeTocqueville
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Careful, there! Extracting too much gold will inflate the gold- based currencies. Better to stick with a nice, stable fiat currency.
;)
--
Wim Lewis < snipped-for-privacy@hhhh.org>, Seattle, WA, USA. PGP keyID 27F772C1
"We learn from history that we do not learn from history." -Hegel
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Gold's value is mostly symbolic, largely irrational. As an industrial chemical, it would be worth a fraction of its current value.
So if you produce a lot more gold, you'll dilute its value in roughly the proportion that you increase the amount in circulation. Same with diamonds, which were once worth a few dollars a carat until the supply was restricted.
You could make a heap of money transiently, if you had a modest-scale way to extract and sell gold.
Such dreams of getting rich off gold is another indicator of its irrational appeal. Other materials are more valuable and less exploited.
John
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Even geo exploitation of "useful" materials like coal is often a dubious way to make money.
Where would you rather live? Netherlands where they don't even have land? Or Iraq where if the oil wealth was distributed on a per head basis, every man woman and child is or will soon be worth over $10 million?
But that doesn't mean geo exploitation doesn't often have beneficial spinoffs, i. e., Texas Instruments invention of the chip.
Already someone mentioned uranium from sea water. In that case the energy supply from nukes really could last thousands of years.
Bret Cahill
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On Tue, 11 Nov 2008 09:33:49 -0800 (PST), Bret Cahill

Hmmm... that calculates to 2.7e14 dollars. $270 trillion. 5.4e12 barrels at $50 per.
I sorta doubt that.
John
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Again, what are Bernanke's options when the whole country is wired?
Bret Cahill
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On Tue, 11 Nov 2008 20:19:33 -0800 (PST), Bret Cahill

Math-immune!
John
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Assumption-immume!
! ! !
! ! ! !
(Lots of exclamation points keep our newsgroups morons happy.)
Anyway before anyone can do any calculations requiring the price of oil we'll need an answer the question:
What will be the "solution" to the financial "situation?"
Bret Cahill
This question's got me going, Won't someone set me right? Will Bernanke cut interest rates, Today or tomorrow night?
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On Wed, 12 Nov 2008 22:25:54 -0800, Bret Cahill wrote:

The obvious answer is privatize, and let the people that bought mortgages that they _knew_ they couldn't afford, planning on riding the bubble and making a killing, go broke. You certainly wouldn't bail out some idiot who loses his life savings at the craps table!
But, that doesn't look like it's in the crystal balls - it looks like we're about to follow the former Soviet Union into collapse.
Cheers! Rich
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...

The revelation that the only thing behind any boom is the faith of the people, and the only real value in any currency (gold-based or not) is the faith of the people. The empty space in the art that is the economy, are the people that walked away.
David A. Smith
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Recessions reflect nothing more "interesting" than a breakdown in communications. "Interesting" is in quotes because breakdowns in communications are the most interesting phenomena of all.
What most don't understand is freedom of communication far more fugitive, far more psychological than generally assumed.
Adam Smith should have treated the matter more thoroughly but his "invisible hand" was nothing more mysterious than free speech.
Someone asks, "hey, cool, where did you buy that?"
Supposedly Apple Inc. is hiring now. Jobs is better at the psychological component than most novelists.
Bret Cahill
"Psychology, the queen of sciences."
-- Nietzsche
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If you think oil will remain at $50/bbl for more than a couple of years you ought to buy up some of these SUVs now being dumped on the market.
A smart young man like you could make a killing!
! ! !
Bret Cahill
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On Wed, 12 Nov 2008 22:52:07 -0800 (PST), Bret Cahill

Geez, you don't do math, do you? That's why you have so many "ideas."
John
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