Ice properties under extreme cold and pressure

I am trying to figure out maximum height a given diameter base can support, cooled to liquid nitrogen temperature.
Cannot find stress-strain rate and other related data for ice at very
low temperatures and high pressures, into the Terra Pascal range.
1 : 1.5 maximum stable slope of sand dunes have any validity ?
Resulting shape parabolic as in ice fields ? http://epsc.wustl.edu/~epsc353/lectures/flow_03_p1.pdf
Exponential taper as in scale height of a column ? http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Space_Transport_and_Engineering_Methods/Methods/1
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zippo wrote:

Terapascals? That high? 1 TPa = 9.87E6 atmospheres. The pressure at the center of the earth is 14E6 atmospheres. Do you really expect to find experimentally measured stress/strain curves at these pressures? Besides that, ice will surely mechanically fail far before that, regardless of temperature.
http://www.dartmouth.edu/~ianbaker/Ice/mechan.html (high purity ice crystal, 20C, gone by 50 MPa with 1-2% strain)
I think you have to worry more about what form the ice is in, and the magnitude and type of impurities and defects. These will have a much larger effect on stress/strain than temperature, but you can be sure that if this is ice in any natural environment, it'll have plenty of defects and impurities and will fail much before 50 MPa.
The links you pasted make no sense relative to your question. The parabola is a velocity profile of a flowing glacier and has nothing to do with mechanical strength of ice.
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Thamk you for your reply
I was looked at http://www.google.com/search?client=opera&rls=en&q=Pykrete&sourceid=opera&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8
Wood chips too brittle and not matching ice at very low temperatures to be a good reinforcing material ?
Looks like distilled water only if ice to be used as a structural member.
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

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How is the pressure being applied? Isotropic pressure is very different from uniaxial pressure. If we applied pressure isotropically, then there would be no shear component, so how would the ice fail -- even under "terrapascals" of pressure?
--OL
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I was trying to understand what is involved in making the highest mountain. Possibility of building an ice ramp all the way into space. Reducing sea levels by hiding a large portion of ocean water in ice Low density of ice reduces the depth the base penetrates below ground level.
Don't have a handle on relating creep, slip, plastic deformation etc. to this. Suspect that George's "angle of repose" from sci.geo.geology is correct. Because it is self adjusting, but how to calculate ? Ice is not high purity, cliffs in glaciers can only get 500 meters high ?. The angle of repose then dominates to what maximum height ?
=============================== Oscar Lanzi III wrote:

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