Micro nuke, nuclear "battery".

snipped-for-privacy@gmx.de wrote:


No. Electricity buyers have paid a large amount of tax into a fund, supposedly for that, but it's not a big job, and government will delay letting it be done as long as possible because every year it isn't done, they can pretend it's hard, and so protect their expected future coal, oil, and gas profits.
--- Graham Cowan, former hydrogen fan http://www.eagle.ca/~gcowan/Paper_for_11th_CHC.html boron as energy carrier: real-car range, nuclear cachet
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On a sunny day (Thu, 12 Jan 2006 13:25:56 -0500) it happened "G. R. L. Cowan"

You are all weaklings. Thank God nuclear power is reconsidered and I just heard that our only commercial reactor in the Netherlands will now stay open until 2033 or so (it was supposed to close earlier). Radiation is actually GOOD for you, as you know sunshine is also radiation, and people go to the beach to sunbathe and it improves their health. It will make us all independent of oil, as after Iran is nuked, and the fight against the commies in South America and Russia has started, there WILL BE NO oil. And the radiation from those few nuke plants that will be left will just be nothing, a little bit background, compared to the radiation caused by WW3 nukes. Nobody needs to clean anything up, as there will be nobody to clean it up left.
If by any chance some mutants or apes make it through the next 10 years, then these will inherit a nice pre-radiated world with no more nasty bugs.
So, sing after me: *Nuclear power, it is like a flower, Good for you, It is what you should do*
I think we should all have our own personal little nuke power plant on the balcony, and RTG generators in our cars. Can be used for heating too at the same time.
Just make radiation detectors illegal or really expensive, and nobody will ever complain.
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote in

Looks like a generator to me; there's a steam cycle which presumably drives a turbine, and a generator via drive shaft. Otherwise a nuclear reactor that's almost completely passive in operation. Interesting.
--Damon
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Looks interesting, though the use of liquid sodium as a coolant worries me if only because it is dangerous stuff.
I think Alaska will let this one fly. I'd like to think this state is a lot less reactionary than the rest of the country.
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On 13 Jan 2006 19:14:20 -0800, "Eric Gisse"

Uh, sodium cooled valves are used in many light aircraft engines. I think people might notice if they caused much trouble.
Regards,
Bill Ward
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Bill Ward wrote:

I have only known about Sodium being used in its' heat transfer capacity in nuclear reactors, and even then within the same breath it is usually mentioned that it is a pain in the ass when it leaks.
I didn't know about it being used in aircraft engines though. I hope all the valves related to that coolant system are well-labeled.

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Sodium isn't a pain when it leaks (well it is, but not the main one). The problem is when it freezes. For most first gen thermal neutron reactor designs they needed to be steam heated even when shut down because there was no way to recover them from a frozen coolant incident. The first Soviet Alfa submarine was decomissioned early on, reportedly after just such a problem.
Presumably this 4S design is one with a simplified primary circuit that can survive freezing - it's typical of the inherently safe designs that they're moving towards "block" designs rather than external pipes and this encourages freeze tolerance.
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Andy Dingley wrote:

---snip
Perhaps you can tell me why there appears to be no interest in alloys of potassium and sodium, which freeze at temperatures down to -12 C. I know that this has been used in the past. Is there a problem with potassium?
--

Paul Studier < snipped-for-privacy@pleasenospamtoPaulStudier.com>
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wrote:

I beleive the sodiuum is sealed in the valves, and the sodium in the reactor must circulate through heat exchangers to do any useful work.
And sodium in contact with air or water is dangerous.
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Richard Henry wrote:

I would like to see the exchangers wrouht into a liquid-plasmic beryllium cannon. U, make that a /radioactive/ liquid-plasmic beryllium cannon.
-Aut
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wrouht -> wrought
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wrought -> wrouht Off with your Norman Cretin scum!
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