Question - Lifespan of digital media

I have a question for physicists/material scientists: As we know, digital media eventually degrade until they're unreadable. Even the best won't last more than a
hundred years in conventional storage conditions.
But what if we took the most inert and resilient media - say a gold plated glass-master DVD - and stored it on a satellite in a vacuum. Would this last indefinitely? After all, the temperature would be negligible, so even the most gradual of processes (such as the glass 'melting' and rolling into a ball) would take millions of years.

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Beacon of Truth and Light (maybe) wrote:

You'd be better off welding it in a stainless-steel can and burying it in Egypt. Micrometeoroids are more of a problem than earthquakes.
Cheers,
Phil Hobbs
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"Beacon of Truth and Light (maybe)" wrote:

Good question. Here's the patents on the technology used to preserve the works of L. Ron Hubbard:
Go here to look at them: http://www.uspto.gov/patft/index.html
6,659,272 System for storing and transporting discs and accessory materials
D462,561 Storage container for compact discs
D462,224 Case for storing and transporting compact discs and accessory materials
After placing them in a suitable storage site, cut a large symbol of some type into the ground to alert future travellers as to their location:
http://terraserver.microsoft.com/image.aspx?T=1&S &Z&X&94&Y656&W=3
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