Water is gritty.

http://www.reactivereports.com/50/50_2.html

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In sci.physics, Autymn D. C.
wrote on 17 Jan 2006 17:17:00 -0800

I was going to make a joke about dropping a ton of solid water on one's foot but this is actually rather interesting. :-) One hopes for accurate measurements then a simulation of this strange water column in a computer, to further understanding.
It might be worth noting that 10^-23 liters of water would be about 335 molecules of the stuff (1 mole of water is 0.018 liter or 0.018 kg).
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You think it has anything to do with the blocky probe? :D
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In sci.physics, Autymn D. C.
wrote on 18 Jan 2006 04:04:14 -0800

Not sure. A more accurate drawing would have shown the silicon atoms at the tip of the probe as well as the hydrogen and oxygen atoms of the water, plus the air molecules moving around.
In any event, the researchers were apparently focusing on the motion in this air ocean, and the forces of the water on probe and surface during said movement. Several variants are suggested:
[1] Vacuum versus air surrounding the probe-water-surface. [2] A thicker, flat probe, which might also be used for research regarding the Casimir effect. [3] Various other fluids such as ethyl alcohol, methane (at low temperature), and helium (at *very* low temperature).
Of course this is off the top of my head; I'm no expert. :-)
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The Ghost In The Machine wrote:

Friend of mine, when he was a student, thought it would be fun to drop a water filled balloon from a tall building onto the parked cars below and watch the splash. It put a huge dent into the car roof it hit.
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In sci.physics, Dirk Bruere at Neopax
wrote on Wed, 18 Jan 2006 14:54:51 +0000

An interesting if somewhat expensive illustration of the danger of falling objects. :-) I've occasionally wondered as to the velocity (and size) of raindrops and the kinetic energy contained therein.
I'd hate to have to worry about dodging grapefruit-sized hail... fortunately, that's very rare, even in areas prone to hail. :-)
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The Ghost In The Machine wrote:

Pray to the raingods for some of these on your foes: <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Megacryometeor .
-Aut
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[hanson] The virtual incompressibility of water is indeed making this fantastic liquid indeed gritty... gritty like emery paper and sand blasting... High pressure water jets are used to cut & machine all kinds of materials, high strength steel included, with efficiency and to great precision. http://science.howstuffworks.com/question553.htm http://www.emachineshop.com/machines-kerf/water-jet-cutting.htm ... not to speak of the hydraulic mining that was so efficient that it got outlawed already in the late (1880?). This could not have happened if water would not be "gritty" and compressible So, next time, be careful when you get an enema... Better just ask for a colonal irrigation instead... ahahahahaha... ahaha... ahahanson
PS: I am sure that the relativists have an Einsteinan explanation why water has these properties and that the manufacturers of these machines could not have developed them without using relativity in the design and manufacture of these tools. So, let's hear it, gamma and all.... I am also sure that you will be paid a fat buck if you come up with an Einstein story that promotes and sells these machines... just like in the GPS, where they have done that trick for their marketing departments very successfully. Get at it with your usual rela fanaticism... make some real rela$$$...
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hanson, you illiterate, they need abrasive for metal. Others made the same mistake, who couldn't even read their own references: <http://groups.google.com/group/sci.physics/browse_frm/thread/e6b5beb257f4e376/f79869078218f955#f79869078218f955 .
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and nitpicked with extraordinary care and seasoned intent.... about nothing in to hanson who wrote in http://groups.google.com/group/sci.physics/msg/a5482e2998cc99c1

[Dyslexia]
<http://groups.google.com/group/sci.physics/browse_frm/thread/e6b5beb257f4e376/f79869078218f955#f79869078218f955 .
[hanson] ahahaha... yeah, yeah, just like 0.999999... is not 1.
I appreciate your perhaps well meant efforts, but .... thanks for the laughs and "Don't call us. We'll call you"... ahaha.... ahahanson
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<http://groups.google.com/group/sci.physics/browse_frm/thread/e6b5beb257f4e376/f79869078218f955#f79869078218f955 .
The water jet thing :) I wonder if that moron understands the internal diameter of the nozzle is typically 0.010" when new and how often they wear out.
http://www.accustream.com/cgi-bin/search.pl?Category=FLOW_Equipment&SubCategory rasive_Nozzles&Title=Nozzles_by_AccuStream_for_use_in_Flow_Equipment
Mind you, I woudn't use a water jet on metal when a good industrial laser will do.
http://www.lasag.com/Images/startbild_orig.jpg
Hexenmeister.
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Hexenmeister wrote:

I agree. I've used water jet cutters, and spent several years programming two-axis laser motions. The lasers are considerably less risky.
-Mark Martin
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hanson wrote:

included^^^^^^^^^^^,
"Abrasive jets" cut steel.
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ahahaha... AHAHAHAHA.... hahahaha.... PMS and Dyslexia?... ahahaha...
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hanson wrote:

from you?
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