soft metal alloy

Hello, Which metal alloy is the most soft, easily cutting, workable by knife. I wont it for artwork. Tin is too rigid. Can I buy it or make in
workshop? Thank You.
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snipped-for-privacy@holcim.com (Ivan Minarovic) wrote:

There are several formulas of very soft, low T melting Bi-Sn alloys. Look for "Wood's metal" with google. Can be prepared in workshop, but be careful: never in a platinum crucible!...
J.J.
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snipped-for-privacy@holcim.com (Ivan Minarovic) wrote:

You find lists of soft alloys when looking for:
"fusible alloys" "low melting point alloys"
either with google, or in any edition of the "Handbook of chemistry and physics"
J.J.
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Ivan Minarovic wrote:

Sodium can be easily cut with a knife. Did you require any other properties?
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Uhmm, don't you see potential problems with suggesting Sodium for the intended application?
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"Kevin G. Rhoads" wrote:

If the original poster had any other restrictions on the material, he should have mentioned them. For all we know, he might like the patina which forms on a raw sodium surface.
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