How many cfm can a typical hair dryer blow?

I think it's somewhere between 10 cubic feet per minute (cfm) and 100
cfm, but can anyone give me a more precise value?
Anyone have a hair dryer manual, a link to specs, ???
Thanks,
Michael
Reply to
mrdarrett
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If you know the wattage of the hair dryer and you can measure the temperature rise you can work out the cfm easily.
Google "specific heat capacity" or see...
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Reply to
Cwatters
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Pat. 4230279
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go turbo
We live in a Golden Age raining soup and you complain about all the yellow while using your soup bowl as a rain bonnet.
Reply to
Uncle Al
??? He is asking for cubic feet of air isn't he? Why bother with heat at all? To get a roundabout figure. Place a plastic bag that holds ten cubic feet of air or larger, tape the bag around the output nozzle. turn on and time the fill rate til it is full and stop your watch. That will give you 10 cubic foot per "time" or whatever size bag you have per time. do the easy math to convert to cfm.. :)
Be sure you have it on "cold setting" if you have it on too long. or be sure to be carefull enough to not melt the bag if only hot is available. Gotta love physical experimentation and basic math. It is way more fun than "math only stuff". :)
Reply to
Spaceman
Trash bag... great idea. I never thought of that. I was thinking of a Ziplok bag, and measuring for < 1 second... not too accurate...
Thanks,
Michael
Reply to
mrdarrett
No prob, have fun and of course. never be stupid, but crazy is OK. :)
Reply to
Spaceman
Ah, I see, I didn't describe the problem adequately. The posted wattage of the hair dryer is kind of irrelevant because I ripped out the heating element from a surplus hair dryer. I discovered the blower operates on 12V, 1A. So it's this cold air I was trying to analyze.
Uncle Al had a good point, use muffin fans instead (one of his sites said hair dryer motors work only for a few hundred hours, vs. thousands of hours for a muffin fan). Muffin fans routinely post their CFM specs. So now I can move on...
Michael
Reply to
mrdarrett
Good thinking batman err I mean Spaceman.
Reply to
Cwatters
Dear mrdarr...:
=2E..
Remember to check delta-p... they don't do well at all as "vacuum cleaners" or "forced air blowers. The squirrel cage of the hair dryer is better for pressure work, even if the motor is designed to merely outlast the interest of the one that uses it.
How much air do you need to move? What sort of things are you going to expect to do with the air?
"ring compressors" are pretty good, if you need either a mild vacuum or pressure (a few feet of water). Some selections in Grainger.
David A. Smith
Reply to
dlzc
The Parlux 1900 watt model (in black) proclaims its flow as above average at 69 cu meter/hr which runs out at 41 cu ft/min
Brian W
Reply to
Brian Whatcott
Yep I see it now...
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Thanks,
Michael
Reply to
mrdarrett
OK and what is the answer? The air becomes 90 centigrades.
Reply to
David Jonsson
OK and what is the answer? The air becomes 90 centigrades.
Reply to
David Jonsson

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