How big a face mill can a Millrite MVI handle?

I'm considering getting a face mill, and am looking for field reports
and suggestions. I've been using a fly cutter for facing, but it's slow
and probably hard on the bearings. This really is a job for a face mill.
I have a MVI vertical mill with the original low-speed 1 HP motor driven
from a VFD, with an R8 spindle.
My first question is how large a diameter is reasonable. I've heard
that such machines can spin a 3" face mill with no problem. Would that
that be for steel, or only for aluminum? What sizes have people used?
My second question is what make and model of face mill to get. Again,
what kinds have people used, and how well did the face mills work?
Thanks,
Joe Gwinn
Reply to
Joseph Gwinn
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You get what you pay for. One cadilac is the sandvik R390 3" face mill. Big $ and worth every cent. These inserts run best without coolant - they put the heat in the chip.
Karl
Reply to
Karl Townsend
Volume of a solid bounded by a cylindrical surface is: V= ((4/3 x pi) x (radius cubed)) = 14.1 cubic inches for a radius of 1.3inches.
According to Machinery's Handbook, and if all elements such as sharpness, optimum rate of feed, efficiency of power transmission, etc are taken into account:
The "K" factor (specific power consumption) of plain carbon steel is given as 0.63 HP required to remove material at the rate of 1 cubic inch per minute. Therefore, it would take 22.4 minutes to remove 3 inches of material with 1 HP turning a 3" face mill. And that is if everything else is optimum. Thus it would take at least 22.4 minutes to remove the 14.1 cu. inches. Not likely, because of lost motion re. repeated passes.
A more reasonable diameter to cut on a 1 HP mill might be 1 inch. That works out to 48 seconds; but again would take longer because of lost motion between passes.
Bob Swinney
PS: Someone please check me on this because I'm pretty loopy right now because of Vicodin taken for a broken ankle, in a cast.
rbon Steel of Brinell 80-100 requires a unit HP of 0.63. Slinging a 3" face mill of area Pi x R sq.
I'm considering getting a face mill, and am looking for field reports and suggestions. I've been using a fly cutter for facing, but it's slow and probably hard on the bearings. This really is a job for a face mill.
I have a MVI vertical mill with the original low-speed 1 HP motor driven from a VFD, with an R8 spindle.
My first question is how large a diameter is reasonable. I've heard that such machines can spin a 3" face mill with no problem. Would that that be for steel, or only for aluminum? What sizes have people used?
My second question is what make and model of face mill to get. Again, what kinds have people used, and how well did the face mills work?
Thanks,
Joe Gwinn
Reply to
Robert Swinney
Make that radius 1.5 inches not 1.3 as my stupid PC thought I meant to type!
Volume of a solid bounded by a cylindrical surface is: V= ((4/3 x pi) x (radius cubed)) = 14.1 cubic inches for a radius of 1.3inches.
According to Machinery's Handbook, and if all elements such as sharpness, optimum rate of feed, efficiency of power transmission, etc are taken into account:
The "K" factor (specific power consumption) of plain carbon steel is given as 0.63 HP required to remove material at the rate of 1 cubic inch per minute. Therefore, it would take 22.4 minutes to remove 3 inches of material with 1 HP turning a 3" face mill. And that is if everything else is optimum. Thus it would take at least 22.4 minutes to remove the 14.1 cu. inches. Not likely, because of lost motion re. repeated passes.
A more reasonable diameter to cut on a 1 HP mill might be 1 inch. That works out to 48 seconds; but again would take longer because of lost motion between passes.
Bob Swinney
PS: Someone please check me on this because I'm pretty loopy right now because of Vicodin taken for a broken ankle, in a cast.
rbon Steel of Brinell 80-100 requires a unit HP of 0.63. Slinging a 3" face mill of area Pi x R sq.
I'm considering getting a face mill, and am looking for field reports and suggestions. I've been using a fly cutter for facing, but it's slow and probably hard on the bearings. This really is a job for a face mill.
I have a MVI vertical mill with the original low-speed 1 HP motor driven from a VFD, with an R8 spindle.
My first question is how large a diameter is reasonable. I've heard that such machines can spin a 3" face mill with no problem. Would that that be for steel, or only for aluminum? What sizes have people used?
My second question is what make and model of face mill to get. Again, what kinds have people used, and how well did the face mills work?
Thanks,
Joe Gwinn
Reply to
Robert Swinney
They look nice. Where are they sold?
What about the R245?
The Sandvik Coromont website seems too complicated for its own good, but very good-looking.
Joe Gwinn
Reply to
Joseph Gwinn
That would be for steel. The 3" may assume aluminum, which was one question I had.
I'll have to run the numbers in the Machinery's Handbook calcs.
I cannot imagine cutting 14 cuin of metal using a flycutter.
Joe Gwinn
Reply to
Joseph Gwinn
The only place you can afford it is on eBay. My son keeps joking about all the people stealing these from work to auction on eBay.
I've not used this one.
Reply to
Karl Townsend
That was an interesting discussion. I will try to go through my face mills and see which ones I can use. I have about 6.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus2733
That would be for steel. The 3" may assume aluminum, which was one question I had.
I'll have to run the numbers in the Machinery's Handbook calcs.
I cannot imagine cutting 14 cuin of metal using a flycutter.
Joe Gwinn
The "K" factor, 0.63, was taken from Machinery's Handbook and it is for "plain carbon steel" The calculations were based on a radius of 1.5 inches.
Bob Swinney
Reply to
Robert Swinney

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