Re: Holes or Notches for fork lift tangs?

On Thu, 31 Aug 2006 18:05:42 +0000, Rich Grise wrote:

The hole is better for strength, but the notch is better for the forklift driver, since he can just drop the tips of the fork to the ground and slide them in, rather than stuff about trying to align them with the hole.
Stupid material to use for a pallet by the way, is this our taxes at work?
Cheers
Greg Locock
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Well, that's nifty! Not sure what it is for, but from someone who drives a forklift regularly.....you have a top heavy load, and the slots would give a distinct advantage over the notches in preventing it from toppling during transit...

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Rich Grise wrote:

Is that jig just used for shipping or does that pipe section have to be standing upright while in the jig for installation and/or operation? The reason I ask is that it would seem to me that shipping the pipe lying down would be preferable. If that jig is going to be used to align the unit while installing it, the slots might cause problems when the forks are withdrawn. It would be easier to drop the forks to the floor (with notches) and not risk snagging them on the bottom of the slots and putting stress on the pipe joints.

Its gouing to have to work fast. Those boosters only last about 40 seconds before they blow themselves up.

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Since this system has a laser and probably some kind of optical bench with mirrors you absolutely want to go with notches, and big ones at that. There is no doubt that some forklift driver will be going too fast into the pallet and will be a little off on his estimate of the notch positions. The resulting jar will not be good for your optics. The difference in stiffness is very small.
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Charly Coughran wrote...

Right, this strongly argues for notches, because one dimension is constrained by the floor, allowing for a smaller vertical cutout.
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- Win
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This is the wrong design philosophy for a part like this.
The forklift drivers *will* hit the floor with the forks, at some point. It's all very well to say "they should have been competent!" but that won't fix the damage after it's happened.
Anything that's going to be handled by heavy machinery has got to be built to take the damage that will reasonably ensue. I used to work in the oilfield...every conceivable way that the transport process can damage your equipment will, eventually, take place. Typically at the most inconvenient moment. It is the designers job to protect the part from what the users *will* do to it, not what you want them to do to it.
A hole with a dented bottom will have the same strength, for conservative analysis, as a notch (no credit for buckled aluminum). Since you can't reasonably assume that your hole will never get damaged, and that gives it the same strength as a notch, why not go with the notch and avoid the entire issue?
Tom.
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