52100 properties

I've had a hard time finding properties for heat-treated 52100 used in a ball bearing. Matweb, Mil-Handbook 5, and basic internet searches
haven't produced an answer (or one I'd feel comfortable quoting in a report). Does anyone have a handbook that references heat-treated 52100's properties? The main items I'm concerned with are yield stress, ultimate stress, and elastic modulus. The source would also be greatly appreciated
Thanks in advance for any help anyone can provide! Dave
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Dave,
If you get no good responses don't be surprised! The fact that you even ask for the "elastic modulus" of a material that is know to be s steel exposes your ignorance.
Ed
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Ed wrote:

WAUW!
That was the most difficult internet search on google, I've ever done in my entire life...
INCREDIBLE... AMAZING that I even found it... I must be a genius or something.
I searched for "52100" on google and chose the link named "crucible selector - AISI 52100", www.crucibleservice.com/ eselector/prodbyapp/carbon/52100.html
And what happens?
*********** AISI 52100 Alloy Steel Typical Chemistry Carbon 1.00% Manganese 0.35% Silicon 0.25% Chromium 1.50% Typical Applications Bearings Gauges Draw Dies Mandrels Drills (Non-Ferrous) Taps (Hand) Forming Tools Threading Dies (Hand) Annealed Hardness: BHN 183/212.
Thermal Treatments Critical Temperature: 1385F (750C) Annealing: 1440F (780C), hold 2 hours, slow cool 25F(15C)/ hr max. to 1200F(650C), then air or furnace cool. Hardness BHN 183/212 Stress Relieving Annealed Material: 1100-1300F(595-740C), hold 2 hrs, air cool. Hardened Material: 50-100F(30-55C) below last tempering temperature, hold 2 hrs, air cool. Straightening: Best done warm 400-600F (205-315C). Hardening: (Atmosphere or Vacuum Furnace). Preheat: 1200-1250F (650-675C), equalize. High Heat: 1500-1550F (815-845C), soak 10 to 30 minutes. For vacuum or oil hardening, use the high side of the high heat range and soak times. Use the low side of the temperature range for water hardening. Quench: Oil or water quench to hand warm, 150F (65C). Temper immediately. Temper: Tempering at 300-500F (150-260C) for at least 2 hours at temperature is recommended. Air cool to room temperature after tempering. Physical Properties Modulus of Elasticity ........................................30 psi x 106 (207GPa) Specific Gravity ................................................................................7.85 Density ...........................................................0.283 lb/in3 (7850kg/m3)
*********
The only strange thing is the 207 GPa.... I would never in my entire life, have guessed that. :-)
Med venlig hilsen / Best regards Martin Jrgensen
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Martin Jrgensen wrote:

<snip> I see you weren't able to find the yeild or ultimate strengths either? I appreciate the help, although I was able to find it in an older handbook we had in our technical library. The problem isn't getting an answer... the problem is getting an answer I can use in a report. Citing the internet sometimes raises eyebrows.
Dave
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:
-snip-

UTS can be estimated from the hardness... I guess you didn't knew that...
Also, you didn't knew that the yield strength sometimes is referred to as the strength at strain level 0.2?

At what level is the report to be written at?
I think you would benefit from reading this introduction: http://www.key-to-steel.com/Articles/Art43.htm
Med venlig hilsen / Best regards Martin Jrgensen
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Martin Jrgensen wrote:

^^^^^^^^^roughly
Michael Dahms
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Ed wrote:

And you've made an incorrect assumption. The modulus between different steel grades does vary slightly, and our analysis is precise enough that I don't want to quote 29000 ksi when it's actually 29500 ksi. Secondly, why'd you post anything if you don't have anything productive to say?
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

You obviuosly dont' know what you are talking about. Young's moduklus depends on texture und microstructure. Strength and elongation as well..
Michael Dahms
BTW: This is an interantional news group. Please, do use international units!
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To challenge you, since you (and I) have a lot to learn note:
(29,500-29,000)/29000 = 1.7%
You stated your analysis is "precision enough" ?? Is 1.7% not precise enough when considering all natural variation and definition limitations (i.e. a true modulus does not exist but is a MODEL)
It is true texture can play a role since:
E [100] = 19,000 ksi; E[110] = 31,400 ksi and E[111] = 40,200
(From Cleanes and Thompson "The Metal Iron" McGraw-Hill 1935 page 352 - Data orginally presented in dynes/cm)
Note an arithmetic (30,200 ksi) or geometric mean (28,800 ksi) of these numbers get one close to the accepted value (at RT) of (29.5 0.5) x10 (see Metals Handbook)
The point is that the variation in modulus between wrought steels is not reasonably detectable nor relevant. Look at the modulus of T316 stainless steel (28,500 ksi) verses A36 carbon steel (29,500 500 ksi) this is also true for density.
Check out the "modulus" for sintered (PM) steels!
Ed
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