Where to get depleted uranium?

Loading thread data ...
Actually, it is! As I recall, removed granite waste is a low-level radiation "hazard".
Banannas will also kick off geiger counters, I guess they are too commonly used by the public to be classed though.
Tim
-- "California is the breakfast state: fruits, nuts and flakes." Website:
formatting link

Reply to
Tim Williams
A standard brick has a volume of about 1 liter, so your DU brick weighed 19 kilograms.
Reply to
bw
Distracting...I like that.
Flaming spalls the temperature of the face of the sun ricochetting at ultra high speeds around the inside of the crew compartment setting fire to the hydraulics, padding, clothing, ammunition.....
Distracting..thats good.
Gunner
Rule #35 "That which does not kill you, has made a huge tactical error"
Reply to
Gunner
U235
Correct.
And the basements of houses built on granite fill up with Radon. There's plenty of radioactive fallout from the 50s, the CO2 in the air is has Carbon-14, water has tritium, potassium-40 occurs in natural potassium, which is everywhere, including bannanas and people. Space is full of natural fusion reactors, the earth has Van Allan belts, recently we got hit with a massive cosmic ray burst, etc.
Reply to
bw
(snip)
DU is a very mild alpha emitter. Alpha particles are stopped by a sheet of paper or your skin.
Reply to
Todd Rich
So, the quick way to obtain a quantity of DU would be to go to Bagdad and point something at a chopper? - -
snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:
Reply to
Rex B
Well...somewhere, in some secure storage facility, are dozens or hundreds of white "bunny suits", gloves, masks, hats, and assorted clothing worn by me, while working in the "hot lab". I was packaging _very_ low level solid sources into test fixtures (for tuning medical nuclear imaging scanners). Even the packing materials are in some "low level nuclear waste" facility, even though the bags couldn't leave our hot lab if there was _any_ detectable radiation level.
I have to try that tonight. The potassium, I suppose?
Dave "What, doesn't _everyone_ have a Geiger counter at home?" Hinz
Reply to
Dave Hinz
I used to work for General Dynamics, the company that made the Phalanx. But that is off topic.
I saw a show recently that stated the the US Army is switching to a tungsten/plastic mixture for bullets to replace lead. They call it a green bullet because it is more environmentally friendly. They claim that they spend a lot of money cleaning up shooting ranges from the lead contamination. That is probably true. However, I bet the higher mass for the same caliber has something to do with the decision as well. Since it is tungsten powder glued together with plastic, I bet the bullet brakes up to powder upon impact. That means that all the energy is absorbed by the target. It should still incapacitate you from the impact, even if you were wearing body armor. Just speculation on my part. No armor would mean even more damage than a normal round.
Reply to
bainite
Not true, although it is denser.
Get in a war with the US or NATO and the military will deliver it, no charge even!
Tim.
Reply to
Tim Shoppa
I have 4 . And various dosimeters. All work just hunkey dory. I hope they never get used.
Gunner
Rule #35 "That which does not kill you, has made a huge tactical error"
Reply to
Gunner
So where does one buy a geiger counter, if one were so inclined?
- - Rex Burkheimer
Gunner wrote:
Reply to
Rex B
First thought is "American Science and Surplus" in Milwaukee and Chicago. They do mail order. Mine came from a former employer - we moved a factory from England to the US, and the test equipment came along. The type of geiger counter they sent wasn't certified by the NRC, so it couldn't be used for production (or at all) here, so I was told to make sure it went away and never came back.
Reply to
Dave Hinz

Site Timeline

PolyTech Forum website is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.