160 pound spring for a 1/2 inch gap?

I want to put a spring under the heel of my inline skate. But
there is only a 1/2 inch clearance, and it needs to be a
heavy-duty spring. Should I consider using a spring steel flat bar
or similar, instead?
Thanks.
Reply to
John Doe
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John Doe fired this volley in news:4f67b801$0$860 $c3e8da3$ snipped-for-privacy@news.astraweb.com:
Belville washers. You can stack them to any height you wish, and get them in anything from mere foil to structural thicknesses.
LLoyd
Reply to
Lloyd E. Sponenburgh
I want to put a spring under the heel of my inline skate. But there is only a 1/2 inch clearance, and it needs to be a heavy-duty spring. Should I consider using a spring steel flat bar or similar, instead?
Thanks. ________________________________________________________ Maybe a piece of rubber or urethane.
Reply to
Tom Gardner
Look into Belleville disc springs (aka washer springs)
McMaster (among many other places) sells them, and has a brief introduction to them if this link is any good (or go search their site if it's bad - sometimes they don't like to paste right)
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McMaster is often fast, often has stuff, but is not always cheapest if you are trying to squeeze the last penny out. They are not infrequently cheap enough if you hunting for the absolute best deal involves spending time that's worth anything on the search.
For instance 9712K69 - Qty. 12 3/8 ID 3/4 OD 166 lb working load each with a height of 0.055 inches for $4.12 - you can fit 9 in 1/2" as an inverted stack, giving a deflection at working load of 0.099 inches for the stack. I'm assuming you have 3/4 inch width available, and are trying to fit 1/2" height. Other options are available if that's not the case.
Reply to
Ecnerwal
You could use belleville washers. They are a type of spring. See the link:
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common and available from many sources. Eric
Reply to
etpm
How much travel do you need from the spring? If your just looking for shock absorption I would use some elastomer compound. You can get it with a lot of different compression rates and then you just mold it in place. Sort of like Shoe goo or silicone based RTV
Reply to
Steve W.
You could devise a lever operated suspension utilizing a torsion bar for a spring. That way, you could adjust it and create the whole new industry manufacturing skate suspensions. ^_^
TDD
Reply to
The Daring Dufas
Would something like rubber work? Bellville washers are great for compression but offer no stability otherwise.
Reply to
Cydrome Leader
Cydrome Leader fired this volley in news:jk8md0 $1e9$ snipped-for-privacy@reader1.panix.com:
What does that mean? They work like any other spring, though constrained differently.
I use them all the time as mold cushions on pressing equipment.
LLoyd
Reply to
Lloyd E. Sponenburgh
Sorry, Mike. I'm running Agent 4.2 and I'm not sure how to strip out other newsgroups in a reply. It appears, when I show all of the fields, that my replies go only to rec.crafts.metalworking. But I don't know.
Can anyone give me a hint?
Reply to
Ed Huntress
At least with the above post, your target and all followups are directed solely to < rec.crafts.metalworking >
Reply to
PrecisionmachinisT
Is it the subject matter, Marbury? You recently replied to an off-topic post crossposted to, of all places (24hoursupport.helpdesk).
alt.home.repair,uk.d-i-y,uk.rec.cars.maintenance,rec.woodworking,24hoursupport.helpdesk
Subject "Bending 3mm metal puzzle"
Your reply about an aluminum kitchen saucepan had nothing to do with woodworking, car maintenance, or the chock-full-of-trolls helpdesk group.
Reply to
John Doe
OK, thanks. I'll pay attention to the headers and see if any indicate more groups. Every one I've looked at says only rec.crafts.metalworking, even when the post I'm responding to was posted to multiple groups.
I'm still not sure what's going on there.
Reply to
Ed Huntress
I think he is talking about how the suspended wheel functions, like how it is held upright. I need to carefully consider that, if I do it.
Thanks to the pinpoint replies.
Reply to
John Doe
You mean like stacking them in alternating directions, one facing up and then the next facing down and so on.
What is "deflection" in this context. Is it the amount that the stack moves to the side? Is it compression? A compression of 1/10 inch?
Also, what is the meaning of "low cycle" in this expression "low-cycle die press applications such as trimming and stamping". I would guess that means "few cycles" or "slow cycles" but I don't know what machine they're talking about.
Thanks.
Reply to
John Doe
4.2 should pop up a warning if you try to reply to a message that is posted to more then one group. Then if you wish you can edit the Newsgroups: line in the header at the top of the page where you are writing the reply.
You can also set parameters to not download messages posted to more than XXX groups. -- Cheers,
John B.
Reply to
John B.
Huh. I've never seen that.
All that *ever* appears up there is RCM.
Maybe I've inadvertently set it for 1.
Thanks, John. I'll have to look a little closer.
Reply to
Ed Huntress
According to McMaster, it is the percentage of spring compression at maximum load.
formatting link
Reply to
John Doe
On Mon, 19 Mar 2012 22:05:28 -0400 in rec.crafts.metalworking, Ed Huntress wrote,
Under Tools->Options->Composition window->Followup crosspost action select Prompt for action
Reply to
David Harmon
AHA! Thank you, David. I had it set for only this NG.
Now I can cross-post to Mars, if necessary... (Only kidding -- I'll be able to see where posts are trying to go, at least.)
Reply to
Ed Huntress

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