2" square stock strength question

Isn't anyone worried about the hitch? I hope the U-Haul kid used really strong poprivets to mount the receiver to the sheet metal under the SUV
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That was my thought as well. The only thing that gave me hope was the fact that it was a 2" receiver which is usually mounted properly now days.
About 1 1/2 months ago I had a similar situation roll into my shop. A older couple from Arizona where coming through with the smallest camper I've ever seen in my life behind there car. Somebody had put a 1 1/2" receiver on the back of the camper and they had a bicycle rack in it. However due to the curve on the camper the bicycle rack had to be extended about 1' so that it stuck out from the receiver about the 30" mentioned here. The rack was holding up fine. However the receiver was just welded to a 2"x3" piece of about 16ga wall rectangular tubing which ran across the back of the camper frame. Of course it pulled and buckled in till the rack was able to drag the ground.
I had to extend the receiver so that it went to the next cross member up the frame and reinforce the back cross member to repair it.
This is the second absolutely lousy poorly thought out welding job to come from Arizona to my shop. The other was when somebody with no welding skills put a 30' dry box off a bob tail truck onto another camper frame made from 2"x6"x14ga rectangular tubing. The tongue pulled out twice before it got here and neither place that repaired it did as good a job as my dad could do welding it back (and my dad is NOT a welder by any stretch of the imagination). I ended up making a new frame from 6" channel with proper 6" channel cross members (the original had light weight C purlin type cross members which where broke) and a reinforced tongue before I would let it back on the road.
The original welding on that frame was so lousy that I was able to take the 3" I beam off that they'd welded down the length (so they could U-bolt the box to the frame) by grinding one weld. The other welds where not stuck to anything.
I'm starting to get nervous when I see a Arizona tag. :-)
Wayne Cook Shamrock, TX http://members.dslextreme.com/users/waynecook/index.htm
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wrote:

And well you should... To describe just one example, a neighbor came up to my place (in AZ) to use my equipment. I just watched, somewhat amazed while he stick-welded two identical sledge hammer heads as spacers between the springs and axle of a pickup bed converted to a water hauling trailer (2400 lb. load). The rest of the project was equally ah, interesting. And he never touched the wire brush and chipping hammer I supplied. I keep waaaaay back when I see this kind of stuff on the road, no matter where it's from.
Wayne
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Walt, Having spent the better part of my 25 years as a welder/machinist in the army "field engineering" (usually field fixes for poor design "real" engineers put into play) I also am a fan of over building. Now...having said that...the good captain here has a point that stands at the very root of field engineering...find an equivalent field force test. That principle has NEVER failed me (when combined with my 0ver build habits. There is most definetly a down side to over building...namely stuff gets too %$#@!! heavy. In today's "over sue" world, you probably won't find anyone (myself included) who can promise you 1/8" wall tube will be O.K.. Especially when we don't have an actual detailed design to look at. I will tell you that if I'd done the test the good captain did & got the same results, I'd go ahead & use 1/8" (with gusseting & bracing whereever possible). Also, I'd tell you...next time look at using some 1/8" wall chrome-molly (4140) tube...it's good enough for stock car frames! Hope this helped -Wayne "Clutch" Glass-
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