20Ft Shipping Container to Machine Shop Conversion

wrote:


Snarl,
When I moved from Utah, I hired a crane to load my three containers on flat beds. Three trailers to haul the three containers, two of them 20', one 40'. Combined weight of the two 20's was greater than could be hauled on one trailer. The crane, using a spreader, picked the three containers in about an hour, including setup and teardown, and was gone. Cost less than $300. It was a site to behold when he picked the 40' container, which held my 10,000 lb. lift truck in one end, along with the 6,000 pound induction furnace in the opposite end, to say nothing of the balance of the container being filled with other shop related items and personal effects. I doubt you'd get a fork lift large enough to handle containers for any less money, especially if they're loaded, and cranes can set up on lousy terrain. Unloading was a whole different matter. The crane was an old mechanical, not hydraulic, and the owner conveniently forgot to mention that he'd charge me for transporting, a flag car, and other little things that netted him about $1,200. My advice? Ask questions before committing to anything!
Harold
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On Tue, 19 Jun 2007 05:59:04 GMT, "Harold and Susan Vordos"
Hey Harold.

Sure, but they were nowhere's near th' weight caps of each 20'. I'm a retired longshoreman and 20'ers in excess of 50k lbs wasn't unusual at all. I don't remember what th' tare cap limits are on a 40' flatbed but divide that by two and there still isn't much net weight in either 20' can. Prolly a good reason why ya rarely see two 20's on a flatbed.

That may seem like a lot, but it's really not much weight comparitively speaking to what a 40' can hold. I've had a Hyster 750 on it's lips more than a few times. And if it didn't pick level, th' rigger didn't know what he was doin'.

I know *I* could, dunno about this feller. He just posted that th' total weight won't be anywhere's near a problem for a Hyster 350, it'd be a piece O' cake. And *I* could get one delivered, th' job done, and out of here for less than $200... but I've got a few connections.

That (terrain) could be a problem alright, and it's a variable we don't really know about. That said, I've driven a bull in some really shitty yards (not paved, huge potholes, etc.) and got er done despite of it <g>.

Excellent advice, and methinks that's what th' OP is doing.
Enjoy th' sunshine Harold, sounds like it'll be gone again on th' first day of summer, heh, heh.
Snarl
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    [ ... ]

    Why not mount the carport to the hard points on the top of the corners? That way, it could simply be lifted off prior to moving it again.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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DoN. Nichols wrote:

That would work, but I already have one that is free standing. I'll just need to get some longer square tubing that's used for the legs. It's 18' x 21' and would provide shelter for about half the container and allow about 10' of sheltered work space out front for any cutting and burning that might need to be done. Of course, for the right price the length could be extended to include all the container and still offer the extended front. ? Possibly but two of them end to end for 10' extra on each end. :-)
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On 19 Jun 2007 00:03:41 GMT, with neither quill nor qualm, snipped-for-privacy@d-and-d.com (DoN. Nichols) quickly quoth:

"Winds gusting to 60mph tonight..." maybe?
Shades of The Flying Nun...
Otherwise, that's an excellent idea, Don.
- Metaphors Be With You -
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On Mon, 18 Jun 2007 18:37:44 -0700, Larry Jaques

Just weld th' uprights to corner locking cones. That's what locks one can on top of another. It's just a 90 or 180 degree twist of a lever to lock/unlock. About any place that sells can's is gonna have 'em.
Snarl
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Are they cheap?
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On Sun, 17 Jun 2007 21:06:41 -0400, "ATP*"

Good idea if you're going to be in there a lot, and there are other people in the house who might get security conscious on you - without checking if anyone's inside before they lock it up and go in the house.
A steel-framed steel-skinned exterior door cut and welded into the opposite end of the container as a "Back Door" would be perfect. Make a header and jamb out of 4-1/2" square/rect tubing.
--<< Bruce >>--
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On Jun 18, 2:12 am, Bruce L. Bergman

I'm a fan of doors that dont need keys to let you out i will be installing a side door
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wrote:

If you carefully cut out th' windows and door panels re-use them as hinged exterior shutters and a door panel that's also lockable. Piano style hinges and whatever style of padlock, etc., will give you an extra level of security and from a distance retains th' look of a normal can.
Snarl
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Hello Brent:
I'm not familiar with the specific product of which you speak... but find it highly unlikely that a paint product of any sort would provide R19 insulating capability.
The actual insulation in most "insulation" is air or another gas. The fiberglass, styrofoam, etc. is there to hold the air still. Styrofoam and urethane are more effective, inch per inch, than fiberglass batting because the air pockets in styrofoam are sealed from one another. A layer of material the thickness of paint is unlikely to hold enough air to be effective insulation.

Only if the container is completely submerged in water, or buried in the earth. Anodic protection works when the entire surface being protected is acting as the cathode. That can only happen if the atoms of iron at the surface are immersed in the electrolyte.
Best -- Terry
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