3 phase on single phase

I have a hunter DSP 9000 tire balancer for sale near me. But it is 220 3 phase which i dont have. I know there are phase converters available but they are expensive.

I read somewhere that 3 phase motors can be run on single phase 220, but the motor start would not work. (You can spin the tire once by hand to get it going then it would work).

Does this sound correct? What about the electronic read out on the machine? Would it work on single phase 220 without a converter?

I appreciate it!

Reply to
stryped
Loading thread data ...

They use the three phases for more than just the spindle. Unless that balancer is VERY cheap (like under $500.00) you will have more into it than buying one set up for single phase. Or buy a large rotary converter and be able to run more 3 phase stuff.

Reply to
Steve W.

As I recall from fixing one for a friend who owns a tire shop..his 3ph machine has a 3ph motor in it to drive the wheel during balance.

About a 3hp motor as I recall

Reply to
Gunner Asch

You always try to jury-rig stuff. This is a several-thousands-of-dollars machine. You can't spend $300 on a proper inverter to drive it?

If not, cobble up a static converter from $50 worth of parts, or build a rotary converter from about $200 worth.

GEESH! Don't you EVER research anything before you ask for advice? All you ever want to know is how to do a "crap job for pennies", when you could do a GOOD job for a few bucks.

If all you ever _try_ to do is shit work, then all you'll ever make is shit work; and from it will just be more shit in your garage.

Lloyd

Reply to
Lloyd E. Sponenburgh

Funny, all these years, and I didn't realize you were such an asshole.

Reply to
Existential Angst

"stryped" is a troll, no bigee trolls aren't real.

Reply to
PrecisionmachinisT

"Existential Angst" fired this volley in news:51dbb694$0$581$ snipped-for-privacy@cv.net:

Your context being "always"... Stryped isn't a troll, he just asks such idiotic things, he sounds like one. He's one of those dolts who, like EA, is widely known for his half-assed, unskilled work, who's unfortunately real, and who believes everything told him by morons like EA.

Lloyd

Reply to
Lloyd E. Sponenburgh

"Existential Angst" fired this volley in news:51dbf239$0$581$ snipped-for-privacy@cv.net:

I saw you 'agree' in one breath, and attack my skills in the second -- and you know nothing of what I do or how well I do it.

I apologize. When I said "$50" for a static converter, I forgot that your time is worth nothing, and you just nail loose components to your walls, rather than buying or building proper enclosures, providing non- abrading cable entries, strain reliefs, plugs, etc. Since you don't use them, you wouldn't know this; those 'little things' add up quickly, unless, like Gunner, you've got seven acres of junk to pick through when you need a part.

Heh... when Grainger sells something "half price", then it's only TWICE what the normal retail price would be. They also list 'surplus' stuff that's on their books, but for which they have no stock (anywhere in network).

I agree: You don't need large idler motors. As you say, ganged smaller motors can work, too. But large or small, they all take up more space than a decent VFD.

For 3HP, who'd want all that noise and rotating hardware taking up space and wasting power when a small solid-state device will do the work BETTER (better symmetry in the phases without load-specific tuning), AND is programmable for ramp times. And with most equipment like that tire balancer, there's enough empty space in the stand/cabinet to enclose the VFD, so the whole device 'becomes' a single-phase unit.

Lloyd

Reply to
Lloyd E. Sponenburgh

How about using a machine tool running unloaded, such as a pedestal grinder, as the rotary converter for other motors?

jsw

Reply to
Jim Wilkins

"Jim Wilkins" fired this volley in news:krh09k$1e5$1 @dont-email.me:

It would work, Jim. I can think of several reasons why I wouldn't want a grinder acting as an idler; but it would work.

Lloyd

Reply to
Lloyd E. Sponenburgh

Could you give the reasons that apply to a quiet one-man hobby shop, as opposed to a noisy, distracting business with >1 workers present?

jsw

Reply to
Jim Wilkins

"Jim Wilkins" fired this volley in news:krh2ll$ed1 $ snipped-for-privacy@dont-email.me:

Jim, I know you're not a troll, but that's such a troll-like question!

1) One worker or 100, having a grinder with open wheels or brushes running ALL the time is just plain dangerous. A grinder dedicated to a production job might run all the time, but not one that's casually-used. 2) One lapse of thought, one accidental swinging of some stock into the rotating wheel, and you might be injured. 3) Unless you strap the on-off switch on, you might absent-mindedly switch it off after a grinding job, which might or might not affect the other running equipment using it as the 3rd-leg generator 4) It's just not _right_. It's an 'ugly solution' of a sort just begging to be done differently.

Lloyd

Reply to
Lloyd E. Sponenburgh

I personally think that it is a hazard to have a grinder running all the time unattended.

I scrap a lot of used 3 phase motors, and I could sell one for just 2x scrap (to justify the time and expense). It works out to appx. $15 per horsepower. If shipping is not involved, it is pretty sensible. With shipping, usually the total cost is a bit too much for most people, and that's why I scrap those motors and do not bother selling.

If you can find someone like me in your area, you could get, say, a ugly dirty used 3 phase 5 HP motor for $75 and be all set. Or a ugly dirty 2HP motor for $30. etc

i
Reply to
Ignoramus13897

I haven't done it, just wondering if there was a consequence I havn't thought of and couldn't easily avoid by guarding it. For example each motor would need an indicator light to show that it's running, in case several machines were used as idlers to increase the available power capacity. jsw

Reply to
Jim Wilkins

"Ignoramus13897" wrote in message news:faidnevz47L0i0HMnZ2dnUVZ snipped-for-privacy@giganews.com...

I think I know every scrap dealer for at least 100 miles, and haven't seen any inexpensive 3 phase motors in 20 years of looking. jsw

Reply to
Jim Wilkins

Craigslist.

Reply to
PrecisionmachinisT

"PrecisionmachinisT" wrote in message news:mt6dnXWHRoUmvkHMnZ2dnUVZ snipped-for-privacy@scnresearch.com...

It's only a theoretical question anyway, as I put single phase TEFC motors on my lathe and surface grinder and the mill already had one.

I was wondering if the pedestal grinder, an incomplete drill bit sharpener, could be its own simple rotary converter since it could be jump-started with a drill. jsw

Reply to
Jim Wilkins

phase which i dont have. I know there are phase converters available but th ey are expensive.

the motor start would not work. (You can spin the tire once by hand to get it going then it would work).

e? Would it work on single phase 220 without a converter?

This balancer is 300 dollars. But it also does not have the cones or anythi ng with it which I would have to get. I really wanted it for my home shop. I have three vehicles currently and have adaughter that will be driving sho rtly. I live out in the middle of nowhere so it is hard to get things such as this done.

I have thought about an old fashion bubble balancer but have read some peop le say they wont work with modern radial tires but I have others who swear by them.

Reply to
stryped

Good idear, I think. Or a drill press, etc.

3 ph begets 3 ph....
Reply to
Existential Angst

PolyTech Forum website is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.