A Craftsman's Legacy

This is a TV show that ought to interest RCMers. It's a series about crafts
men and how they work. I happened to catch an episode on a local PBS statio
n the other day, about a guy who makes knives -- from Lake Superior iron-or
e sands. That's really making something from scratch.
Anyway, it's pretty good show; you can join the network for free and watch
streaming shows online. The website is a little messy but it's worth spendi
ng a little time with it. They have shows on metal casting, various kinds o
f woodwork, long rifles, watch making, and so on. Check it out:
formatting link

Reply to
edhuntress2
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The Professor, on Gilligan's Island, could make anything! Couldn't fix the boat, though.
Reply to
Molten Baby
Well, that would have ended the show. So not fixing the boat was a perverse incentive -- something like a health insurance company keeping someone alive. Financially, they're better off dead, and doing so quickly.
Reply to
edhuntress2
But he had to make everything out of coconuts which, obviously, weren't seaworthy enough to fix the boat.
Reply to
PAS
They're really hard to glue into planks.
My dad, who fought in the South Pacific, said you don't want to try to cut down a coconut palm, either.
Reply to
edhuntress2
Why not? Palm wood isn't partuicularly hard.
Reply to
John B.
From what he said, they were rubbery and resistant to an axe. That's what they had to cut them. Mostly they used the logs to cover their foxholes at Guadalcanal.
Reply to
edhuntress2
Interesting. I know that palm lumber has no heart or sap wood and the wood is referred to as "fibrous" which would probably make them a bit hard to chop down.
Reply to
goodsoldierschweik
Why would you want to leave, you're on a tropical island with Mary Ann!
Mikek
Reply to
amdx
+10!
Reply to
rangerssuck
Royal Palm is very hard to cut and very rot resistant.
Reply to
clare
Probably not a lot of Royal Palms growing in the South Pacafic.
Reply to
John B.
Very common in West Africa and along all the slave routes in Africa
Reply to
clare
Its tough to really say, because no one really knows when slave routes there began. Its like they've always been there. A few even to today.
Reply to
mogulah
I lived in the south Pacific for years. Cocounut palm and Nut Palms are there. Most anything else was shipped in by a 'king' to make something different.
Martin
Reply to
Martin E
It is the same in most of S.E.A, coconut palms and Nut Palms.
Reply to
goodsoldierschweik
It is very much the same in most of S.E.A, Coconut palms and oil palms. Cash crops, in other words.
Reply to
goodsoldierschweik

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