Does anyone actually own a pig roaster

If you own a pig roaster or know someone who does, then I just have a couple of questions. 1) how often is it actually used and 2) Just how
much of a hassle is it -- how long it takes from start to finishing cleanup, and how intensively does the pig need to be tended while cooked.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Oct 24, 11:10pm, Ignoramus10132 <ignoramus10...@NOSPAM. 10132.invalid> wrote:

The best roast pig I have ever eaten was wrapped in (Clay)mud and cooked in an underground pit. A little bit of labor but well worth it.
DL
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 24 Oct 2010 22:06:02 -0700 (PDT), TwoGuns

These guys know what they're doing:
http://cuban-christmas.com/pigroast.html
Newb
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I do not own one, but have in the past. How often it is used can vary. Once people find out you have one, you might use if frequently. People may want to borrow it (bad idea) or they may want you to come and cook for them. Those have to be weighed on an individual case basis weighing headaches vs. benefits. It will take 24 hours to get it all out, prepare the pig, season, marinate or rub, cook, and then clean up. Design of the cooker will dictate how long it takes to clean it, and if you run into a problem, as a welder, you may be able to make a design change. The pig takes something on the order of babysitting a two year old, as they can get into trouble just about as fast
All depends on what winds your clock It is a lot of work, and you have to tapdance inside the lines with the Health Department, and be sure to understand their rules in advance. For friends, family, and work, doing it say 6-12 times a year, it just could make you the center of attention if only for a day.
Did I mention you get a lot of free beer, and attention from female hog cookout groupies, some exciting, and some boaring.
Steve
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

An under-marketed-to segment, if ever I saw one

-groan-
Dave
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Oct 24, 6:10pm, Ignoramus10132 <ignoramus10...@NOSPAM. 10132.invalid> wrote:

It'shardtobeattheresults.Onlyhelpedwithoneonceanddidn'thavetocleanitbutitwassomeofthebestporkI'veeverhad. Karl
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

cooked.
I've got a scaled-down unit I built that's able to handle about 80lb dressed weight -- so really, a "shoat roaster". But roasting shoats are always on the market around here, and they fit the size gathering I'm willing to cook for.
It's a big hassle. If you truly like low-n-slow barbeque, it's worth it, but you can expect to tend the fire at least once an hour for 24 hours. Too hot, and you put a rind on the meat, too slow and it can vary from a bad case of food poisoning to just never getting done. Missing your dinner schedule by four or five hours just isn't an option when 40 people are getting drunk waiting for the bell.
I run mine at 205-210 degrees. Even with dual (stack and fire door) dampers, it's a bit of a juggling act to keep the heat constant.
Real wood, only. I'm partial to blackjack oak; bark on.
Except for the grease cans, I fire clean mine. That's not a hassle, at all.
LLoyd
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Lloyd E. Sponenburgh" <lloydspinsidemindspring.com> wrote:

My bud loaned out his roaster to a friend with instructions. His is propane powered. Friends wife power washed it. My bud was P*SS*D.
I'm a member of the scrape when necessary and fire clean discipline when it comes to grilling.
Wes -- "Additionally as a security officer, I carry a gun to protect government officials but my life isn't worth protecting at home in their eyes." Dick Anthony Heller
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I enjoy grilling, too, but... like I say to everyone who mentions grilling in a barbeque discussion --
"GRILLIN' _AIN"T_ Barbeque!"
<G>
LLoyd
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Lloyd E. Sponenburgh" <lloydspinsidemindspring.com> wrote:

I fully understand. BBQ is slow cooking and it sounds like you are slow cooking and smoking the meat. Sounds yummy.
Wes -- "Additionally as a security officer, I carry a gun to protect government officials but my life isn't worth protecting at home in their eyes." Dick Anthony Heller
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

yeah... I'm getting hungry. The wife is on a veggy kick, and I haven't had some real meat in about three days.
I gotta fire up the cooker!
LLoyd
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 2010-10-26, Lloyd E. Sponenburgh <lloydspinsidemindspring.com> wrote:

Good idea. I want to smoke some beef brisket again.
i
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

My fave. I have a local butcher who'll sell me 12-14 lb packer-cut briskets for about $1.79/lb. They cook out to about 9-11 lb, and are so tender you cannot handle them without their falling apart.
With the right rub, you can't beat 'em.
LLoyd
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 2010-10-26, Lloyd E. Sponenburgh <lloydspinsidemindspring.com> wrote:

The fatties are the best.

I used to make my own, but may have lost the recipe.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Magic Dust #2 - this started with the Mike Mills recipe, modified by Danny Creagan, but has several changes to increase the "savory" factor. This is meant to be slow cooked/smoked. Up the sugar to 1TBSP for pork or chicken. Great for brisket as below. You may want it a bit hotter; increase cayenne to taste.
If using this for grilling, eliminate the sugar entirely.
2 Tablespoons paprika 3 Tablespoons kosher salt, finely ground 1-1/2 teaspoons sugar 1 Tablespoon hot chili powder 1 Tablespoon granulated garlic (finely ground for chicken) 1-1/2 teaspoons mustard powder 1-1/2 teaspoons ground cumin 1 Tablespoon ground black pepper 1 Tablespoon cayenne pepper finely ground 2 Tablespoons onion powder
Combine all ingredients and mix thoroughly. Makes enough rub for 3 slabs of pork loin back ribs or two medium brisket
LLoyd
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 2010-10-26, Lloyd E. Sponenburgh <lloydspinsidemindspring.com> wrote:

Lloyd, this is exactly what I was looking for and lost. Thanks.
i
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 25 Oct 2010 18:52:25 -0500, "Lloyd E. Sponenburgh"

Sprain difference, preese?
-- If you're looking for the key to the Universe, I've got some good news and some bad news.
The bad news: There is no key to the Universe.
The good news: It was never locked. --Swami Beyondananda
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Larry Jaques wrote:

Grilling - Quick cooking at high temp with direct radiant heat
Barbecue - Slow cooking at low temp with indirect heat
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Some time shortly after Henry Ford invented the charcoal briquette, someone (or a bunch of someones) who didn't know the difference equated cooking over a high heat fire on a "grill" (a gridiron) with the low heat, slow cooking done mostly by country cooks and blacks.
The "barbeque grill" became a popular item, promoted mostly by Mr. Ford in an effort to sell his waste oak from car chasses, and spurred by the new-found leisure time afforded his highly-paid factory workers.
Most Americans continue to call a grill a "barbeque". One _can_ barbeque in a covered grill, but it's painstaking work to maintain a constant cooking temperature in one. A real barbeque relies either on an open fire in a pit or fireplace, or a contained fire in a "fire box" connected by flues to the cooking chamber that provides a gentle heat of only 200F- 220F for as much as 24 hours. The containing structure also traps smoke which flavors the meat.
A grill cooks over very high heat, usually with the fire directly beneath the meat, and only a small distance separating them. Where barbequeing might take a full day, grilling can be completed on something like hamburgers or not-thick-enough steaks in just a few minutes.
Both have their virtues, and most "real" barbeque-ers grill too, but not very many grillers barbeque. Mostly it's because barbeque is too much work, and takes too much special equipment and too much time.
LLoyd
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 2010-10-26, Lloyd E. Sponenburgh <lloydspinsidemindspring.com> wrote:

So, Lloyd, if I cook (roast) a rotating pig for 6 hours, what is the proper name for this activity?
i
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Polytechforum.com is a website by engineers for engineers. It is not affiliated with any of manufacturers or vendors discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.