A realization on "G code scripts"

Yeah, NFS Wizards in Mach 3 have functions to do that built in. You just tell it to ramp to depth. It drills a helical pattern to depth and then finishes the pocket. If the pocket is multi pass it will do it for each pass.

Reply to
Bob La Londe
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Might as well have fun. Pictures are expected ;)
Wes -- "Additionally as a security officer, I carry a gun to protect government officials but my life isn't worth protecting at home in their eyes." Dick Anthony Heller
Reply to
Wes
I do have a spare registered dongle for one of the older versions of MasterCam btw...I was wanting $1000 for it..but ..I might Swap for it.
Gunner
One could not be a successful Leftwinger without realizing that, in contrast to the popular conception supported by newspapers and mothers of Leftwingers, a goodly number of Leftwingers are not only narrow-minded and dull, but also just stupid. Gunner Asch
Reply to
Gunner Asch
The provisions on this machine are saving to tape (a weird miniaturized cassette which is not quite compatible with the tiny answering machine tapes) or to punched tape via a RS-232 interface (which is what I use to save to a computer instead -- though it is awkward in any case.
I do have a (totally undocumented) 3-1/2" floppy drive with a controller card on it from the Emco-Maier people which can replace the tape drive (and which probably acts *just* like the tape drive from the front panel controls) which I have not yet bothered to make up the mounting hardware for. But I'm not at all sure that it is any better than the tapes, other than floppies are easier to find. :-)
Note that this has no home positions. You move to somewhere and then select absolute mode, and it works from there. If the program stops and power is lost (e.g. the e-Stop) it also loses track of where it was.
You can't define the tool offsets at the beginning of the program -- *each* time you call up a tool, you have to enter the offsets with it. And the tool turret does not have a home position either. You tell it to move forward N stations (so you have to keep track of where it is -- and have to end the program with a return to the starting station or everything will be a disaster when you start again. :-)
Remember -- this is not EMC -- or anything else serious. It lives entirely in the address space of a 6502 (the CPU used in the Apple-II or the Commodore PET).
I believe that it was sold to be used as a training tool, not a working one. :-)
Enjoy, DoN.
Reply to
DoN. Nichols
Hmm ... what about arguments to make a circle elliptical?
With *that* -- you will need a much more complex program, blending various curves to make the total desired shape -- and you might as well find a section which is the largest segment of a circle and ramp down during that, then complete the shape from there.
Enjoy, DoN.
Reply to
DoN. Nichols
No -- I mean *outside* the rectangle. If you are making a rectangular plateau -- or cutting the outside dimensions of a plate, you can produce totally square corners -- or round them to whatever degree you want, with no consideration of the size of the cutter -- as long as it will fit between the feature you are making and all surrounding ones.
But when doing the *inside* of a rectangle, you *can't* produce a square corner unless you have a special tool which holds mills at a 45 degree angle and the mills come to a sharp point at just the right angle. *That* can be fed vertically to make the inside of the corners sharp. But it will have to be re-oriented for each corner, unless the workpiece is on a rotary table.
Otherwise, your inside corners are limited to the radius of the mill being used.
Picture what would happen if you had a 1/2" diameter (1/4" radius) end mill, and asked it to produce a 1/8" radius in the corners. If the software is good -- it will simply error out. If not, it will attempt it, gouging out around the corners. :-)
BTW A trick for roughing vs finish cutting. When you first run the program -- *lie* to it about the size of the cutter, telling it that the cutter is N thousandths larger than it really is, so it will leave "N thousandths"/2 of material on each surface. Then re-run the program with the true size of the mill entered, and you will get a finish cut. (You will also waste some machine time as it re-cuts air in the pocket forming and such, but you can slightly re-write the program to only do the finish passes if time is more important to you.
[ ... ]
O.K.
Yes -- that makes sense. Some things (like blending curves to straight cuts) may benefit from a CAD program generating the desired shape, and a CAM one generating the g-Codes as a starting point -- which could still be hand optimized.
Enjoy, DoN.
Reply to
DoN. Nichols
However -- Mach 3 requires Windows under it, which Iggy does not care for -- and neither do I -- especially with servos instead of steppers. If you got a BSOD just after issuing a fast move -- the axis or axes would keep going until they hit the overrun stops -- even if it meant moving the cutter (or what was left of it) through the workpiece which happened to be in the way beyond the planned stop point.
Again Windows based -- though less chance of disaster if you get a BSOD so that might be acceptable for those willing to run Windows. (It never *said* anywhere that it was Windows but this strongly suggests it:
====================================================================== To install plugins, download and unzip them to the plugins subfolder of the CamBam application folder. This is usually at "C:\Program Files\CamBamPlus\plugins" or "C:\Program Files\CamBam\plugins". ======================================================================
Between the backslashes delimiting subdiretories and the "C:" drive designator, I don't think that anything else (other than MS-DOS) would fit.
Understood!
Enjoy, DoN.
Reply to
DoN. Nichols
You actually interested in it? It has hummm...5 Mastercam versions on it IRRC..master mill, the lathe thingy and 3 others.
Ill have to go dig it up and refresh my memory as to which version its good for.
Lots of downloads out there..with the dongle..they are legal. Or mostly
Gunner
One could not be a successful Leftwinger without realizing that, in contrast to the popular conception supported by newspapers and mothers of Leftwingers, a goodly number of Leftwingers are not only narrow-minded and dull, but also just stupid. Gunner Asch
Reply to
Gunner Asch
I haven't a clue if I would like Master Cam or not. I have not played with it at all. For 2D an 2.5D I like Cam Bam a lot. It took me a few weeks to get a handle on how it works, and if I had time to just sit and play I could probably have done it in a day or two. Supposedly it does 3D pretty well, but I have not gotten a 3D CAD program yet that I can use effectively to try it. I am fighting right now with some shapes that I just can't seem to backdoor without hand writing the code and using my Excel macro to do the reiterative work. It's a big pain. However, if I could get the dongle in exchange for taking you fishing for a couple days (something I would do anyway)... I would atleast give MasterCam a try. LOL

Reply to
Bob La Londe
I've posted my treprectramp.c program, which generates G-code to ramp down while milling along the interior outline of a rectangular cutout, then makes a finish pass at full depth. See
formatting link
Jon
Reply to
Jon Elson
Jon, I am writing a function (in perl), to do what you did, but possibly in multiple passes for many pockets. I will reuse that idea.
After maybe half a year, I will provide it as a module on CPAN.
It would be essentially a library with building blocks for CAM. Could be useful for someone willing to write a GUI for it or for some websites.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus8473
If his E-stop chain breaks the PPMC estop circuit, then EMC will be notified of the condition, and it stops, showing the current block of G-code. EMC continues reading the encoder position all the time, so you don't have to re-home or reset the part coordinates. Unfortunately, EMC doesn't handle restarts perfectly seamlessly. You have to click on the line (or a different program line that is a better/safer start place) and then select the "start from line" menu. This causes EMC2 to scan through the program and find the coordinates at the beginning of the selected move and go there first before resuming. Most of this works pretty well. One problem is it won't start the spindle and coolant, etc. So, you have to manually set that first before clicking the start from line. (There's an option that disables the ability to start the spindle and go to manual, but this seems to work by default.) You have to leave the machine in such a position that the restart move is clear of crashes.
Jon
Reply to
Jon Elson
At the very least, it is very useful to record in non-volatile storage the line number of the G-code step that was started just before the eStop, as that step may be the problem.
More generally, I would build a "flight recorder" in, recording say the last 100 codes and their line numbers, the exact time of execution, and an eStop flag to mark where the airplane crashed.
Joe Gwinn
Reply to
Joseph Gwinn
...
...
[Following is OT in R.C.M so I adjusted Subject]
Some safety systems aboard the Deepwater Horizon were based on Microsoft Windows NT and got frequent BSOD's. Here's an article that suggests that use of Microsoft Windows is partly to blame for sensors and alarms being inhibited aboard the drilling platform:
is an over-the-top article on the same topic.
Reply to
James Waldby
I really do not care for Windows.There is one thing that I need to do in Windows -- update maps on my GPS -- and I have been postponing that.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus1880
Reboot, reboot, reboot. LOL. One thing I like about the version of Ubuntu distributed with EMC2 is that you can set install it over top of Windows and set it up for dual boot so you can go to Windows or Linux as needed.
Reply to
Bob La Londe
We have Mazak Qt-250's and multiplex's using w95 for the hmi, thankfully the backend (NC) is a mitsubishi processor. That seems to work. W95 didn't try to do to much.
I've had the joy of dealing with a windows based assembly cell. IFix, Kepware, FactoryTalk, yada. What a steaming pile of chit. Oh yes, to stay on theme, our SCHMIDT® Servo Presses are running NT4.
Meanwhile back on another line, mostly plc and panelview based, things work fairly well.
Another line also plc based with one win hmi app, I think is factory talk, works fine software wise, has issues mechanically but we will figure that out eventually.
Windows is fine for desktop apps. It isn't a mission critical OS.
Wes -- "Additionally as a security officer, I carry a gun to protect government officials but my life isn't worth protecting at home in their eyes." Dick Anthony Heller
Reply to
Wes
NASA uses 'Embedded NT' in some of their telemetry equipment. I would think that the Space Shttle and the ISS were mission critical.
Reply to
Michael A. Terrell

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