Alloy machining question

I am quoting a job for NASA that requires a triple helical set of holes of
varying pitch and varying diameter to a blind depth. The alloy is
samarium-dysprosium-ytterbium, which normally wouldn't present a problem,
but they increased the dysprosium on this job to 16%, which of course
changes the eutectic structure from face centered to body centered. As you
all know this prohibits the use of fluoroscopy in the process. I am
concerned about the Guinier-Preston zone, which I'm sure you all realize is
the preprecipitation domain in a supersaturated metallic solid solution. I
feel this may result in a pseudobinary system or ternary alloy system.
Should I suggest they use a quasibinary system of linear composition which
would exhibit congruent melting, wherein all equilibriums, at all
temperatures, involve only phases having compositions occurring in the
linear series?
Thank You
Dr. Dixon
Tech. Director
Fermi Laboratory
Reply to
Dixon
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try making it from cardboard and duct tape, it will be lighter...
i
Reply to
Ignoramus13880
Acht! Not the DREADED PRECIPITATION DOMAIN!! If you cut into the precipitant and slice off the vesicles to the domain, that would be the end of life as we know it! The world would be completely sterilized, and impotent, to boot.
Zis ist a problem that can only be solved in the realm of imaginary numbers, Herr Doktor. You must rework your equations for quadrature detection.
I remain available to consult for an appropriate fee, as usual. Copious quantities of deep-dish Chicago pizza will be considered as a deposit. There's a good place in downtown Aurora, just a few miles from Fermilab.
As always, you can reach me in my lab...but keep your hands to yourself. Leave a message with Igor if I'm out with one of my subjects.
-- Dr. Sigmoid Fleet, Psychoproctologist to the Stars
Reply to
Ed Huntress
Speaking as a machinist with nothing more than a high school education: again, please, and in English this time.
Harold
Reply to
Harold and Susan Vordos
Bash it with a bigger hammer, then file it to size. :o)
Reply to
Misty & Sean Foley
"Dixon" wrote: (clip) wherein all equilibriums, at all temperatures (clip) ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ HAH! I caught you. The correct word is "equillibria."
Reply to
Leo Lichtman
It can be easily proven, that the system described is an over-euthectic alloy. So all properties described in the quoted sentence just have to be inverted. Obvious!
Nick
Reply to
Nick Müller
Cast it out of free machining Unobtainum, then do the finish work on a HF hexapod. Pretty simple job actually. Much easier than telling a woman that yes..the dress makes her look fat. And far less painful.
Gunner
"Pax Americana is a philosophy. Hardly an empire. Making sure other people play nice and dont kill each other (and us) off in job lots is hardly empire building, particularly when you give them self determination under "play nice" rules.
Think of it as having your older brother knock the shit out of you for torturing the cat." Gunner
Reply to
Gunner Asch
That would work, but whatever you do, don't add electricity to it and give it to your kid!
Reply to
Dave Lyon
I want to help tillman build an electric ray gun out of a tv set too. MJ
Reply to
mj
Just farm the job out to India, or PRC. No problem...
Red
Reply to
Red
A request similar to this one came my way one day at 3M some years ago. Trouble was, it was for real.
All I can say(all in one breath) is:
Its all right to enunciate with meticulous exactitude, but please don't become inebriated with the exuberance or your own verbosity for it's too copious for my diminutive comprehension.
Pete Stanaitis ------------------------
Dix> I am quoting a job for NASA that requires a triple helical set of holes of
Reply to
spaco
"spaco" wrote: (clip) Its all right to enunciate with meticulous exactitude, but please don't become inebriated with the exuberance or your own verbosity for it's too copious for my diminutive comprehension. ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ Eschew obfuscatory polysyllabification.
Reply to
Leo Lichtman
Like forty-twelve. And eleventeen!
There's actually a really, reallllly funny story that goes along with that comment.
I think we're in a very strange zone here.... and it ain't eutectic!
Jim
Reply to
jim rozen
No. I can't believe you'd make such an childish error.
Besides, no matter what you suggest, they won't listen.
They can't even figure out when O-rings freeze. Get real.
Jim
Reply to
jim rozen
Well, what are you going to do, make us beg?
-- Ed Huntress
Reply to
Ed Huntress
Heh.
Well, I work with a very pleasant individual who is quite the oddity among engineers. Very social and interacts with lots of other folks here at work. Our group has been running so much smoother since he's been in it it's amazing. Basically male engineers are clueless for social issues and he's kind of raised our conciousness.
All this to give a background for the guy.
Anyhow he worked in the building long before he was with us.
He related this story which has become pretty famous here.
There's another engineer who has a back deformity of some sort. But our guy (we'll call him "G") had reason to interact with the that other engineer (call him "A"). They saw each other fairly infrequently because their functions on the project they were on didn't share much in common. But G always made sure to say hi to A because G was just a social kind of guy.
Then one day G was talking to another person about a technical problem and G made the comment "I know just the person to talk to about that, he knows all about it. Go talk to Igor."
"Who?"
"Igor - there he is over there, don't you know Igor?"
"That's "A." His name is "A."
"No, so-and-so told me that guy's name is Igor. I've been calling him Igor for the past year!"
"Nope. That's "A."
So G had been calling this guy Igor for almost a year. And A was such a quiet guy he never said anything about it.
G was mortified. Everyone else, being male engineers, thought it was pretty funny overall.
Jim
Reply to
jim rozen
Jeez, Jim, that kinda makes me glad I changed my major from engineering...
-- Ed Huntress
Reply to
Ed Huntress
Hey Dick,
I believe I see where you are going with this. I'm in total agreement with your thoughts about the amalgam of these substances with these highly desirable but little known interfeces, and their idiotsyncrasies. It is truly most unsettling when bodies such as NASA make unilateral autonomous changes in the well known past practices. In this case, essentially preventing the use of normal methods for cleansing the contranal-venting port viz-a-viz best common practice of Associative Wind Purge (ASS-WIPE) of this residual material. Although I'm a bit premature in mentioning this while the work is on-going, recent experiments here in Canada have shown the application of a Layton jar left in place during the dumping process holds great promise. But until such times as that process is proven, my advise would be that you suggest to NASA that casting the material via bowel re-emplacement, using the recently developed SNiiPS (shoehor-nitinplace system) would be the best method. Done concurrent with the proper location of a Hy-lift or Hy-lift JR, both of which have been recently developed by American Standard, as I'm sure we all know, either of these will do an excellent job of splatter control.
On a personal note, may I say how refreshing it is to see such forthright communication from a leading fixture in the science. I have followed your career since your under-graduate work for your BS, when you began your thesis on " Para-Inserting Stiff Solids In Noxious Gasses, Controlling Overtly Natural Tri Ester Supra Torrents" . Fine work!
Take care, and Good Luck.
Brian Lawson, Bothwell, Ontario.
Reply to
Brian Lawson

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