Almost let all the magic smoke out

I have a motor on a stand that I mount wire wheels, nylon abrasive
brush wheels, Scotch Brite wheels, etc. The motor is not totally
enclosed so it draws abrasive dust and metal dust through it. I have
been using the motor for over 20 years and I do blow it out from time
to time. It has never given me any problems until yesterday. I was
using it and I heard a popping noise and copious amounts of smoke
started to pour out one end of the motor. I took it apart to
investigate and it was pretty dusty inside but I could not find any
obvious culprit for the smoke or the popping noise. There was one fine
wire that was pulled a little away from the the rest of the motor
windings and this wire looked a little cooked. So I painted the
windings at that end of the motor with red Dykem, several coats,
tucked the wire back up against the windings, painted a little more
Dykem on, let the stuff dry, and reassembled the motor. It now runs
fine again, doesn't get hot even after running for a 1 hour test, and
doesn't smell of burned insulation. I checked the windings for
continuity to ground and there is none. So I think I only let a
little bit of the magic smoke out. Nevertheless I will continue to
live dangerously and use this motor with wire wheels and so on.
Eric
Reply to
etpm
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I have a motor on a stand that I mount wire wheels, nylon abrasive brush wheels, Scotch Brite wheels, etc. The motor is not totally enclosed so it draws abrasive dust and metal dust through it. I have been using the motor for over 20 years and I do blow it out from time to time. It has never given me any problems until yesterday. I was using it and I heard a popping noise and copious amounts of smoke started to pour out one end of the motor. I took it apart to investigate and it was pretty dusty inside but I could not find any obvious culprit for the smoke or the popping noise. There was one fine wire that was pulled a little away from the the rest of the motor windings and this wire looked a little cooked. So I painted the windings at that end of the motor with red Dykem, several coats, tucked the wire back up against the windings, painted a little more Dykem on, let the stuff dry, and reassembled the motor. It now runs fine again, doesn't get hot even after running for a 1 hour test, and doesn't smell of burned insulation. I checked the windings for continuity to ground and there is none. So I think I only let a little bit of the magic smoke out. Nevertheless I will continue to live dangerously and use this motor with wire wheels and so on. Eric
Reply to
Stormin Mormon
"Stormin Mormon" fired this volley in news:JWCms.265863$ snipped-for-privacy@fed14.iad:
I know of a Mormon elder who's temporarily out of work...
Lloyd
Reply to
Lloyd E. Sponenburgh
I'll be there in half an hour!
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"Stormin Mormon" fired this volley in news:JWCms.265863$ snipped-for-privacy@fed14.iad:
I know of a Mormon elder who's temporarily out of work...
Lloyd
Reply to
Stormin Mormon
Wow, you lucked out, Eric! Magic Smoke is so fine, _all_ of it usually escapes whenever some gets out. Congrats on the fix.
Is Dykem that sticky that you can use it as an adhesive/varnish?
Reply to
Larry Jaques
Though certainly not as durable or tenacious as motor varnish it does dry fast, wicks well, and seems to insulate pretty well. I have used it in motors in the past. And once the motor is assembled there is really no way to cause physical damage to it. I really should buy some brushable motor varnish. I think I'll look for some online and see if it has a reasonable shelf life. Eric
Reply to
etpm
The real stuff to use is glyptal insulating varnish, used to be a standard at radio-tv service supply stores, wouldn't have any idea where to find it these days. Was used for painting over spots where HV was leaking.
Hope that motor has sealed/shielded bearings. My dad's homemade grinder used an old washing machine motor, but had a rather long belt between it and the pillow block he used as a grinder head. The motor would get all crudded up on the outside, but never quit working. No shield on the motor. Used old windmill angle iron for the frame. Not a lot of fun to drill.
Stan
Reply to
Stanley Schaefer
Not sure if it is still avaialable, but I bough my bottle from (GC Electronics) from digikey several years back. Just checked - still available - GC Electronics 10-9002 Red Insulating Varnish.
Reply to
clare

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