Angle shelving uprights - too much point load?

I picked up a sturdy shelving unit (2' x 4' for now) from a local
industrial liquidator; it uses perforated angle for the uprights, and
will live in a residential garage.
While the unit is far more sturdy than I will load it, I still can't
help but think about all of the weight being concentrated on four 1-1/2"
angle ends on the concrete pad.
Is it typical to put some type of base below the angle ends to spread
the load out (steel/wood)?
Thanks,
Jon
Reply to
Jon Danniken
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I picked up a sturdy shelving unit (2' x 4' for now) from a local industrial liquidator; it uses perforated angle for the uprights, and will live in a residential garage.
While the unit is far more sturdy than I will load it, I still can't help but think about all of the weight being concentrated on four 1-1/2" angle ends on the concrete pad.
Is it typical to put some type of base below the angle ends to spread the load out (steel/wood)?
Thanks,
Jon
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I haven't used pads under shelving but I have under other things. They can be difficult to keep in place while setting up unless they are bolted or welded to the legs. A bigger problem is twisting since the diagonal braces typically resist only tension.
Reply to
Jim Wilkins
Hey thanks Jim, I've already planned on using some angle scraps to fasten the uprights to the base pads.
Jon
Reply to
Jon Danniken
Look at grocery store shelving. Usually called gondola shelving. Cantilever strength depends on THE strength of the materials.
Reply to
Bob La Londe
Are you confusing mud with concrete?
Not sure how many tons you plan to put on this shelf to cause the legs to punch through through your concrete floor. Securing it to a wall so it doesn't twist and fall over is not a bad idea though. Single shelving units are fairly unstable, unless it's something like a Metrorack.
Reply to
Cydrome Leader

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