Best Drill Bit For Gummy Aluminum?

Doug White wrote:


<http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?ItemnumberD060> $19.95 Hand punch
or
<http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?Itemnumber510> $24.95 Deep throat hand punch
<http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?Itemnumber787> $9.95 Mounting base for heavy duty punch
I got the last two recently for $17.95 for the punch, and $1 for an 'open box' mounting base.
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No fair! I had that idea!
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Stormin Mormon wrote:

Yeah, three hours after me. :)
BTW, I just bought the last three of these at my local store for $1.97 each. :)
<http://www.harborfreightusa.com/usa/itemdisplay/displayItem.do?itemid 867&CategoryName=&SubCategoryName=>
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Try reducing the rpm of the drill. If that doesn't work, do it again. I've this to be usually effective.
Hul

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Doug White wrote:

Can you just nail through the material? RR
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Sounds like a cordless drill, and zip screws are the answer. Ask any heating and AC installer.
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Zip screws would probably strip out in the soft wood frames if folks weren't careful (which they won't be). We use aluminum 3 penny nails so they don't become dangerous projectiles if they get shot.
Doug White
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Please tell me these clumsy types who can't handle a cordless drill. They aren't allowed to own firearms?
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On Sun, 31 Jan 2010 22:08:45 -0500, "Stormin Mormon"

I watched my freshman roomate wind the entire cheesecloth covering from the bottom of his boxspring onto the bit in a handrill before he manged to let go of the trigger. He's a dentist now. But not *my* dentist.
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The problem is that they can't handle a hammer. Not sure about a drill...
Remember, if these guys were more more coordinated, they wouldn't shoot up the target frames, which are 2' square. I have a pair of frames my wife & I use that I built about 7 years ago. The hole in the center of the cardboard from thousands of shots is only 4 or 5 inches in diameter, and we mostly shoot at 50 yards. I'm thinking I should probably replace the cardboard this year, but only because the area where you staple the corners of the targets is getting soft.
One of my projects for when I retire is to offer free clinics to folks at the club to try to reduce the damage. The problem is that the basic NRA pistol course explains how to shoot, but the major focus is just on safety. People get next to zero practice or coaching, and we always use target pistols with decent triggers. They go out & buy a 9 mm or some such with a 7 pound trigger pull (mandated by the state for "safety reasons") & then look at the target instead of their sights and yank on the trigger.
Doug White
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TiN coating (the gold-looking drill bits) is intended to keep aluminum from sticking. There's also a lubricant wax available that you can keep by the drill press; a touch of the wax on a drill bit tip lubes the next deep hole you drill. Castrol "Stick wax" and LPS "Edge" are brands in my old Enco catalog.
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aluminum
the
steel
The stick stuff is a good idea, but I think I'll start with TiN & see how that goes. I can get split point TiN drills pretty cheap. These will eventually get left at the range house, and the fewer pieces the better. If I buy some stick lube, it will go walkabout in no time. The drill bits are small enough that they should last a while.
Doug White
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Drilling aluminum dry is going to be a problem regardless. A hand squirter full of denatured alcohol used to wet the drill bit and hole will help a lot, and there is no cleanup - the alcohol will simply evaporate.
Joe Gwinn
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You probably have figured out that most anything you put on the drill bit will help and last until it is worn off. Silicon grease is one of the harder things to get off surfaces that one is going to paint, so I suspect it would be a winner here if it were in your shop.
But since part of the problem is not having the " fix " disappear, I would try any kind of wax mixed with some medium weight oil in container that is likely to leak if put in a pocket. A short wide mouth glass jam jar would work. Candles, floor wax, stick lube ( removed from the cardboard tube ) would all work mixed with ATF, 30 weight oil, Chain saw bar oil, way oil, or bacon fat.
Dan
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It's not the bit, you'll get build up on just about anything when drilling that stuff dry. Lots of stuff will work to keep the chips from welding, some healthier than others to use. Tap lube made for aluminum comes up top, runs through various oils, even milk!. Tap wax will work, you can just jab the drill into an end as needed.
Best design for a publically-used target holder I've seen used pipes stuck in the berm horizontally, end on to the shooters, each pair spaced 2' or so and had Vs cut in facing sides to hold the cardboard backers. They didn't get shot up, no richocet problem, you just had to have cardboard cut to the right size. Used about 1 1/2" pipe.
Stan
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snipped-for-privacy@prolynx.com wrote in
<snip>

Our range has 25 yard targets in front of 50 yard targets, and the 25 yard targets are on a turning system for matches. It's all a bit complicated, but it's been working well for the 35 years I've shot there.
Doug White
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Supposedly tin coated bits work a little better, but this really is a job where liberal use of WD-40 and making a mess would help a lot.
My experience show you still get the problems you describe with tin bits if you get them hot and are not using liberal amounts of lubricant.
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