Cleaning morse taper in headstock

Thanks to Steve's, he lent me a MT5 test bar. It fits into MT5 opening in the spindle. My problem is that there is some sort of crud (or
rust) in it and the bar does not seem to be well aligned. So I would like to remove that crud by some non-intrusive means, any ideas how I can do it without runing the accuracy potential of the spindle.
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wrote:

I guess I would use a piece of wood and see it I could scrape out enough of whatever it is on the wood to determine what it really is. Obviously it is not coming out on any tooling you have used, so is pretty hard.
I am guessing his is on a lathe, so is probably swarf that was locked in by another MT5 tool.
Anyway a wooden broom handle or other wood dowel should be your first choice to try to clear the problem.
Paul
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Iggy, You need to borrow a MT 5 finish reamer, thoroughly wet the bore with diesel or kerosene and rotate the reamer lightly. I guess I should have anticipated this and at least asked the question, sorry. I have one of those as well, if you do not have a local source. Steve

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McMaster # 4864A2
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He He He :-)
Mark Rand RTFM
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On Sat, 06 Dec 2008 09:02:01 +0000, the infamous Mark Rand

Is Tawmy boy putting hexes on folks lately? <tsk tsk tsk>
-- Smell is a potent wizard that transports you across thousands of miles and all the years you have lived. -- Helen Keller
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wrote:

HEY....McMaster's 4864a2 is the perfect thing to clean out the bore. OK, it just happens to be one of my inventions. I'd offer one to Ig but the next batch isn't scheduled for production until January and Old Tommy Hubbart's cupboard is bare.
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I will definitely buy one Tom.
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wrote:

If you want to wait until January, I'll send you a freebe.
The max RPM is rated at 1,800 when it's NOT inserted into a bore. You put it in an air die grinder, insert it into a bore, then hit the throttle. The spring compresses and the wire flares out like an umbrella. Then you run it up and down the bore, it self centers. Kill the throttle and stop the die grinder while it's still in the bore, the spring expands and encloses the wire again, then pull the spring brush out.
I've tested these up to 2,600 free of a bore and it whips around and could easily break and kill you if it were to run faster. Usually, the load on a die grinder with the brush whipping around prevents the die grinder from going very fast. It's one of those magic tools that works well when used right but could be dangerous in the wrong hands...I won't let my nephew play with one!
One of my better ideas, I sell about 5,000/month. (helps make up for my many, many stupid ideas)
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Buerste wrote:

Neat tool. How flexible are the bristles? I'm wondering if it would work to clean the EGR passages on engines. They are irregular shaped and the usual method is to use a small scraper, wires and brushes. Something that would reach into the bore and then open during use could be handy.
I did come up with a unique way to clean the EGR tubes used on some vehicles. A bore snake does an OK job.
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What's the diameter? They work on bores, round or irregular, from about 5/8" to 4". A lot of them go to diesel motor rebuilders.
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Buerste wrote:

Cross section on the passages would be about 1". Sounds like they may work well. The EGR tubes run from 3/8" up to 3/4" on those I would love to find a brush similar to a bore snake only using stainless bristles and having more bristle sections. I made up one out of bore brushes attached by small chain. It worked good and was easy to clean. BUT to have made one in each size would have been expensive. If you can't picture it think of a set of 4 chimney brushes connected with chains. Just a lot smaller.
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speaking of cleaning bores - if there was a way to clean the air injection ports on my 993 with some kind of cool brush like thing, that would be a great boon - and it would be something that could be sold widely - these cars are infamous for having carbon block the ports, leading to a MIL light and then (if you are the typical "clean hands" type owner), a $10,000 service charge to pull engine, pull heads, and rebuild.
the ports are between 3/16 and 1/4 inch in diameter and are above the valve stems, so you can see them (barely) once the exhaust manifold is pulled. they go into passages cast in the head and the carbon builds up in these twisty little passages. There are FAQs on the web about how to clean using injector cleaner, but this is not totally effective.
There is access by going up into the ports (around the valve stem), and there is an aprox 3/8 ID tube that carries air into the heads for injection - but I have no idea what the internals of the passages in the heads look like. the "mini-snakes" I have been able to build won't clean it out, though on occasion high pressure air and enough solvent will.
here is a link to a FAQ about this with some photos that may help explain http://p-car.com/diy/sai/1/sai.htm http://www.systemsc.com/pictures.htm http://66.236.61.177/showthread.php?t13946
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6sQYi3iCMw4

It appears that these guys http://www.turbowerx.com/Diagnostics/OSD_Tool/SAI_Diagnostic/SAI_Diagnostic.html must have tried to develop a software way to bypass the SAI monitoring - sure looks like they got shut down by EPA
so, here is a new project for those who are inventive and knowlegable.
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Bill Noble wrote:

http://www.turbowerx.com/Diagnostics/OSD_Tool/SAI_Diagnostic/SAI_Diagnostic.html

I know most of the online stuff uses injector cleaner. The problem is that injector cleaner isn't designed for true carbon deposits. What you want is GM top cylinder cleaner. It is made to dissolve carbon.
It is the same problem that the 4.3 and a couple other GM engines have. The carbon builds up and a chunk breaks loose and blocks the passages. I use the top cylinder cleaner once a year to clear out the crud on my own vehicles and it is one of the things I use in the shop for the same reason. The stuff actually works.
I can count the chemicals in the shop that work as advertised on both hands. Many of them are crap. However Sea Foam, GM top cylinder cleaner, Break Free, and Techron injector cleaner have FAR exceeded what the claims are in my experience.
On the subject of brushes it sounds like you have specific uses as well. In your case you can only reach one end so a flexible twisted wire brush would be good. Look at the brushes sold to clean out spray guns.
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">> so, here is a new project for those who are inventive and knowlegable.

so, what is Sea Foam good for? I have a car that is painted Sea Foam Green, so I have a natrual tendancy to think of it as just green paint
thanks for the tip on top cleaner, I'll see if I can find som
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Bill Noble wrote:

Sea Foam is a great cleaner for small engines and 2 strokes. It also works as a fuel system cleaner. Not cheap but it has cleaned deposits that nothing else touched.
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well, that is interesting - do you think it will work to remove congealed/hardened gas? I have a older Porsche (1956 356A) that I let sit for a few years and the gas congealed - I pumped out the gas tank and redid the inside with sloshing compound, but I haven't attempted to clean out the fuel lines yet - I was imagining spray carb cleaner and a little mini roter-rooter - is sea foam a better choice?
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Bill Noble wrote:

Best thing for old gooey gas is straight lacquer thinner. Sea Foam would work but it's a lot of expense for that use.
BUT make sure that you can open both ends of the line and that no expensive rubber/plastic pieces get a bath in the thinner. It will clean out any of the crud and leave the system dry and ready to rust as well. As soon as you get it cleaned out I would pump some trans fluid or other thin oil through the lines to keep them from rusting while you work on the rest of the vehicle.
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On Sun, 7 Dec 2008 13:01:33 -0800, "Bill Noble"

Consider http://www.slip2000.com/carbonkiller.html This stuff dissolves carbon RFN. Don't know if it's suitable for engine passages but it works amazingly well on guns.
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On Sun, 7 Dec 2008 01:23:33 -0500, the infamous "Buerste"
-snip of McMaster thread-

Ooh, are "Me, Too"s allowed here? They sound like the perfect roto-rooter tool for short lengths of rusted pipe/tubing.
P.S: Have you tried them inside square tubing? Do they work well, OK, poorly, or just self-destruct in seconds?
-- At current market valuations (GM is worth less than Mattel) the Chinese government can afford to buy GM with petty cash. --Bertel Shmitt on kencan7 blogspot
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