Cleaning morse taper in headstock

Thanks to Steve's, he lent me a MT5 test bar. It fits into MT5 opening
in the spindle. My problem is that there is some sort of crud (or
rust) in it and the bar does not seem to be well aligned. So I would
like to remove that crud by some non-intrusive means, any ideas how I can do
it without runing the accuracy potential of the spindle.
Reply to
Ignoramus6679
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I guess I would use a piece of wood and see it I could scrape out enough of whatever it is on the wood to determine what it really is. Obviously it is not coming out on any tooling you have used, so is pretty hard.
I am guessing his is on a lathe, so is probably swarf that was locked in by another MT5 tool.
Anyway a wooden broom handle or other wood dowel should be your first choice to try to clear the problem.
Paul
Reply to
co_farmer
Iggy, You need to borrow a MT 5 finish reamer, thoroughly wet the bore with diesel or kerosene and rotate the reamer lightly. I guess I should have anticipated this and at least asked the question, sorry. I have one of those as well, if you do not have a local source. Steve
Reply to
Steve Lusardi
McMaster # 4864A2
Reply to
Buerste
He He He :-)
Mark Rand RTFM
Reply to
Mark Rand
Some sort of crud could be numerous things. You should be able to determine what's in there that doesn't belong there.
An appropriate soft, improvised tool should be able to remove it. A similar tool can probably clean the hole.
Maybe you could determine what the stuff isn't.
It's a MT5 after all.
Cydrome should be able to offer an explanation. I hope he doesn't disappoint.
Reply to
Wild_Bill
I'd try attacking it with water and a rag, then aromatic solvent and a rag, don't have spindle under power if rag and finger are in the hole.
Then there is that green dishwashing pad if you want to step up the level of agressiveness.
Wes
Reply to
Wes
What I use for crusted oil spooge is mechanical scraping (to get the bulk off) followed by acetone (which gets the last residue off). Acetone will also strip paint, so be careful where it splashes or runs.
Then shine a very bright light into the bore and take a look.
I ended up very lightly stoning the inside of the taper to take the dings and rust spots down, the point being to grind away only the stuff that sticks up above the surface.
I also used the hi-light blue and selective sanding approach to find and remove some larger dings.
But do all this with great caution, to not make things worse. The surfaces need not be pretty to mate properly and yield low runout.
Joe Gwinn
Reply to
Joseph Gwinn
On Sat, 06 Dec 2008 09:02:01 +0000, the infamous Mark Rand scrawled the following:
Is Tawmy boy putting hexes on folks lately?
-- Smell is a potent wizard that transports you across thousands of miles and all the years you have lived. -- Helen Keller
Reply to
Larry Jaques
HEY....McMaster's 4864a2 is the perfect thing to clean out the bore. OK, it just happens to be one of my inventions. I'd offer one to Ig but the next batch isn't scheduled for production until January and Old Tommy Hubbart's cupboard is bare.
Reply to
Buerste
I will definitely buy one Tom.
Reply to
Ignoramus6012
On Sat, 6 Dec 2008 21:43:30 -0500, the infamous "Buerste" scrawled the following:
Doh! I thought you were speaking in hexidecimal. Mea culpa.
I should learn not to jump into the end of a conversation.
McMaster sez it's for a die grinder, BUT, max RPM is 1800 and: "Insert the brush into the workpiece before turning on the power tool to keep the brush from breaking off and becoming a dangerous projectile."
Careful with that floppy, Eugene.
-- Smell is a potent wizard that transports you across thousands of miles and all the years you have lived. -- Helen Keller
Reply to
Larry Jaques
The max RPM is rated at 1,800 when it's NOT inserted into a bore. You put it in an air die grinder, insert it into a bore, then hit the throttle. The spring compresses and the wire flares out like an umbrella. Then you run it up and down the bore, it self centers. Kill the throttle and stop the die grinder while it's still in the bore, the spring expands and encloses the wire again, then pull the spring brush out.
I've tested these up to 2,600 free of a bore and it whips around and could easily break and kill you if it were to run faster. Usually, the load on a die grinder with the brush whipping around prevents the die grinder from going very fast. It's one of those magic tools that works well when used right but could be dangerous in the wrong hands...I won't let my nephew play with one!
One of my better ideas, I sell about 5,000/month. (helps make up for my many, many stupid ideas)
Reply to
Buerste
If you want to wait until January, I'll send you a freebe.
The max RPM is rated at 1,800 when it's NOT inserted into a bore. You put it in an air die grinder, insert it into a bore, then hit the throttle. The spring compresses and the wire flares out like an umbrella. Then you run it up and down the bore, it self centers. Kill the throttle and stop the die grinder while it's still in the bore, the spring expands and encloses the wire again, then pull the spring brush out.
I've tested these up to 2,600 free of a bore and it whips around and could easily break and kill you if it were to run faster. Usually, the load on a die grinder with the brush whipping around prevents the die grinder from going very fast. It's one of those magic tools that works well when used right but could be dangerous in the wrong hands...I won't let my nephew play with one!
One of my better ideas, I sell about 5,000/month. (helps make up for my many, many stupid ideas)
Reply to
Buerste
Neat tool. How flexible are the bristles? I'm wondering if it would work to clean the EGR passages on engines. They are irregular shaped and the usual method is to use a small scraper, wires and brushes. Something that would reach into the bore and then open during use could be handy.
I did come up with a unique way to clean the EGR tubes used on some vehicles. A bore snake does an OK job.
Reply to
Steve W.
On easily examined exterior surfaces I've had good luck with an aluminum scraper, then scrubbing with kero and fine steel wool until shiny metal appears. Usually the function of a precision surface isn't harmed by a few low spots although it's hard to take off even 0.0001" with fine steel wool. I think the crust on old machines might be polymerized lard oil.
Jim Wilkins
Reply to
Jim Wilkins
On Sun, 7 Dec 2008 01:21:11 -0500, the infamous "Buerste" scrawled the following:
Very cool.
Send one (oops, misplaced the instruction sheet) to stryped, please. It just might lessen the number of trolls who taunt us, wot?
Lesbians are creative critters, aren't they? My NoteSHADE is not original but is the perfect (titter) upgrade to an old idea using modern materials.
-- At current market valuations (GM is worth less than Mattel) the Chinese government can afford to buy GM with petty cash. --Bertel Shmitt on kencan7 blogspot
Reply to
Larry Jaques
On Sun, 7 Dec 2008 01:23:33 -0500, the infamous "Buerste" scrawled the following:
-snip of McMaster thread-
Ooh, are "Me, Too"s allowed here? They sound like the perfect roto-rooter tool for short lengths of rusted pipe/tubing.
P.S: Have you tried them inside square tubing? Do they work well, OK, poorly, or just self-destruct in seconds?
-- At current market valuations (GM is worth less than Mattel) the Chinese government can afford to buy GM with petty cash. --Bertel Shmitt on kencan7 blogspot
Reply to
Larry Jaques
What's the diameter? They work on bores, round or irregular, from about 5/8" to 4". A lot of them go to diesel motor rebuilders.
Reply to
Buerste
I would start with increasingly aggressive solvents to dissolve as much as you can. This is guaranteed not to mess up the bore. Then, I'd get (preferably borrow) the right Spin-L-Mate to clean up what's left. They are specifically designed for this job, there are three different grades of wipers to deal with different levels of gunk, and they work well. The only downside is that they cost $$. A #5 MT is $133, and from the sounds of it, you may need to get a set of the heavy duty blades. Note: for some reason the factory wants a LOT less $$ than MSC.
Doug White
Reply to
Doug White

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