Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

Pete C. wrote:


How did you guess that I got out of that job after the first year????
ANYONE who thinks that the children of today are well mannered, pleasant people just needs to drive a school bus for about a month. If you make it that long without wanting to drive the entire bus off a cliff after realizing that "these kids will be ruling the world some day" you may want to talk to a shrink....
--
Steve W.

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"Steve W." wrote:

I don't think the "adults" on a city bus are much better. Or tour busses <gah!>.
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Ecnerwal wrote:

It's pretty simple really, just did it myself.

Only if you want the hazmat endorsement, they have nothing to do with CDLs without hazmat endorsements. I go my hazmat endorsement and it was fast and easy, and extra $60 or so, a quick appointment for fingerprints and my updated CDL with hazmat endorsement in about two weeks.

Yes, if driving CMVs for commercial use. Personal use of CMVs is exempt from logs and hours of service, but since Iggy is looking to haul stuff for his business he will need to keep logs, which isn't that big a deal.

You can rent a CMV for your road test, and when you get your CDL "learner's permit" after you pass the written test, the truck rental place can take you out on the road to familiarize yourself with the truck before your official road test. It's not brain surgery, if you can drive a pickup with a trailer you can most likely drive a semi just fine.

Yes, certainly, get the A and the extra endorsements, it's not much more effort. I got all endorsements except for passenger.
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I do not quite see the point of hazmat endorsement for me.

So, I need to keep logs only for business stuff?
"Went to Dairy Queen"

I can drive a truck with a trailer. The longer the trailer is in relation to the towing vehicle, the easier it is to back up with it.

Thanks!
i
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Ignoramus11295 wrote:

Asbestos wiring? PCB capacitors? Probably under placardable quantities though...

Yes and no. Personal use of CMVs is exempt from logs and hours of service regulations *but* business use is not and your logs must cover 7? hours prior to starting driving a CMV for business use.

Yes, and a fifth wheel hitch puts the pivot point in a better location over the axle than a receiver hitch way behind the axle.

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Ignoramus11295 wrote:

This is where it gets "fun"
The laws say you have to keep an accurate log for the hours you are in operation as well as 7 days prior. So if you went to an auction to buy stuff last Saturday you would have logged that. Then you decide to take a load of stuff to another auction this Saturday. Well now you have to log the days in between as well because those now count. Also the way you log hours gets interesting. You basically have four hour types, Off Duty, Sleeper Berth (must be an actual sleeper) Driving and On Duty Not Driving. Driving is just what it says. You are actively the driver of the vehicle. On duty Not driving gets interesting because anything that is connected with the business but NOT driving counts. Loading the truck, getting fuel, even sitting at the auction house or at a shop waiting to buy/load items gets counted.
http://www.fmcsa.dot.gov/rules-regulations/topics/hos/hos-logbook-examples.htm

Yep. That is why practicing with the vehicles gets to be important. Oh and FYI unless they have changed the driving test the basics are Pre trip inspection (tires, lights, safety gear, leaks,security of the load, HUT tag and such) Engine start, air pressure and gauges check, Driving forward and making turns as the brownie directs. Straight line backing, and parallel parking were in there as well. Nothing like backing a west coast tractor with a 53 foot box in a straight line then pulling up and dropping into the cones and having the brownie get out and use his foot to measure the distance from each set of duals to the curb!

Both passenger and Haz-mat require background checks, and fingerprints. If you do one you may as well do both. Gives you the option of buses and such if you want a part time job.
--
Steve W.

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"Steve W." wrote:

I knew it was 7-something :) Not real critical until I get a CMV myself, and even then since I won't be running a business I'll be exempt.

This varies a bit from state to state and office to office. Around here the pre-trip inspection is a written test only, and the DPS guy just does a quick walk around to check lights and whatnot. They also do minimal parallel parking, basically just move the rig closer to the curb and reasonably parallel. The truck rental places also supply a 27' trailer, not a 53' so that's a bit easier. I think they are reasonable in looking for you to have control of the vehicle, not be perfect and ready for the trucker's rodeo. You need to be safe on the road, but perfect comes with experience.

No! No passengers! <runs screaming> Give me a nice big vacuum truck and let me clean sewers...
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Pete C. wrote:

I know when I did mine in NY the pre trip counted toward the points. I took mine in downtown Syracuse on a Monday just before lunch. LOT'S of "fun". Only thing I missed was I didn't call attention to the brownie wearing his seat belt. I simply said that it was his choice if he wanted the ticket.

Well either way you may have the same cargo .....
--
Steve W.

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typed in rec.crafts.metalworking the following:

    Passengers ... Haz-Mat. Haz-mat, passengers. One loads itself, the other is easier to handle....
pyotr
--
pyotr filipivich
We will drink no whiskey before its nine.
  Click to see the full signature.
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On Thu, 11 Aug 2011 00:04:58 -0700, pyotr filipivich

There's very little difference, as both are caustic. Haz-Mat is much quieter, though.
-- Fear not those who argue but those who dodge. -- Marie Ebner von Eschenbach
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wrote:

But not necessarily the other way around.

Gerry :-)} London, Canada
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On 08/09/2011 04:57 PM, Ignoramus11295 wrote:

For Illinois, you should find the info you need at
http://www.cyberdriveillinois.com/publications/motoristpub.html#cdl
--
Bob Nichols AT comcast.net I am "RNichols42"

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On Tue, 09 Aug 2011 16:57:15 -0500, Ignoramus11295

If you get the CDL, I'll give you ten to one that you start selling liquidated big rigs, too, so go the course.

It would truly behoove you to get the behind-the-wheel time, Ig.

I passed my Contractor's license exam after studying a book and CD for several weeks. I doubt there's anything available from the DMV for that, though, but you could call them and the local truck driving schools to see.
Well, what do you know? http://freeonlinetruckdrivertraining.com / Let us know how it works out, Ig.
-- Fear not those who argue but those who dodge. -- Marie Ebner von Eschenbach
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Ignoramus11295 wrote:

I recently go my CDL, class AM with TX endorsements (double, triple trailer, tanker, hazmat). It is not at all difficult if you are smart enough to understand how air brakes work, and can handle a vehicle with a trailer. I got a few CDL books and reviewed them over the course of a couple weeks in my spare time, then I went to the DPS office here and took the written (computer based) tests of which I passed all 8 or 9 I took on the first try in a total of about 45 minutes.
After that I got in touch with one of the area "rent our truck for your CDL test" places and rented a truck for the road test. The truck place provided a nice Kenworth T2000 auto-shift truck and a 27' "pup" trailer as is normally used in a tandem configuration. The truck folks met me at the DPS office early in the morning and gave me a review of the air brake test and an hour or so of drive time to familiarize myself with the truck, which was on the actual route the DPS uses for the road test.
After I passed the road test I waited in line at the DPS to do the last paperwork, then waited at the truck for the DPS tester. The actual road test was not difficult at all and the DPS guy was very nice, the test took perhaps 45 min. After that a quick visit back in the DPS office where I received my paper temporary license, with the regular license in the mail a week later.
For the hazmat endorsement which you may not care about, there was an extra step of an appointment for fingerprints to go to the TSA for check and approval (new post 9/11). The TSA approval came in less than two weeks and the new license with the hazmat endorsement in the mail a few days later.
The total cost with books, truck rental, license and TSA fees was around $750. If you'd like I'd be happy to loan you the books, or you could just order the best one "Bumper to Bumper the complete guide to tractor-trailer operations" which goes for about $48 and I believe is used by many of the schools.
The bottom line is that it's not brain surgery and you should have no problem passing the test. You will need to get a DOT physical exam, CVS's Minute Clinic does them for $60 or so, and you'll need a log book for any commercial driving you do. Also note that you can't get any traffic tickets waived or the like as you can with a non commercial license.
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Pete, this is an amazingly great answer, something that I have been hoping to hear. Thanks a lot. This is the way to go. I just ordered this book. I will stop by a CDL facility tomorrow, to get a Illinois CDL book.
I
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wrote:

Very informative, Pete.
If i was to follow in your footsteps to get the CDL and then buy a tractor trailer unit. What else would be involved in driving my stuff cross country?
Karl
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Karl Townsend wrote:

Insurance, log book if you don't fall under the personal use exemption, and probably a DOT number (free). Oh, and a lot of diesel at 5-6 MPG :)
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wrote:

Great! Right now its legal for me to buy and operate a semi as part of my farm in MN. Main restriction is 150 mile limit from home. My son wants me to get one but I'm hearing this farmer provision is going away. So, I've been dragging my feet. I thought a CDL was far more expensive both in time and money.
I've been told to watch for a '97 or older because its pre-ABS brake and this is a huge problem on high milage tractors. Have you heard this? OTOH, I'd own the tractor for for maybe 20 years and don't want a friggin' antique. Anyway, where would i go for advice on what unit to watch for?
Karl
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Karl Townsend wrote:

I don't think that farmer provision is really going away, but as you note, it limits your range to in-state and near your farm.
CDL schools cost a bit, seems like $2k-$4k, and even the community college CDL classes are overpriced. As long as you have a clue, the rent a truck and take the test route works fine. The truck rental places typically offer test insurance for a bit extra where if you somehow fail the first test, you get to use the truck for retests at no extra cost. Most people won't have a problem passing the first time, but the extra comfort level of knowing you won't have to pay for a retest can make it easier to pass that first time.

I haven't heard of ABS issues on class 8 tractors, perhaps what was being referred to is emissions controls (DPF) on the newer rigs. Those DPFs are expensive to replace when they wear out, but if you get a truck with a recently replaced one it ought to last you forever in the light service you'd give it compared to normal trucking.
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Pete C. wrote:

The ABS problems were mainly on the older rigs when the systems were first being tested out. They didn't have the ability to cope with the huge load differentials. The newer systems are pretty good. As far as the emissions PIA I would hunt for a rig from 2000-2007, most of those are pretty trouble free and don't have a lot of the extra crap. The new regs are causing a lot of problems for the fire service. Due to the way the engines get operated they have a hard time passing the regs. Many companies went out and bought stockpiles of pre reg engines and gliders or tagged frame rails to build on. So you can buy a brand new custom built rig in 2011 that gets registered as an 09!
--
Steve W.

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