Confidence

When I first started making molds I freaked out about doing anything that I couldn't do in a single setup and a single session. If I screwed
up or forgot to machine a feature I'd often make the whole plate all over again from scratch. Today I tested a mold I had cut yesterday. I realized I totally forgot to machine a critical feature. The mold plate was back on the mill running code in short order. I was working on setting up tools for the new mill before I realized I had done something almost automatically that used to terrify me.
Thanks guys.
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On 6/22/2018 5:07 PM, Bob La Londe wrote:



On 6/22/2018 5:07 PM, Bob La Londe wrote: > When I first started making molds I freaked out about doing anything > that I couldn't do in a single setup and a single session. If I screwed > up or forgot to machine a feature I'd often make the whole plate all > over again from scratch. Today I tested a mold I had cut yesterday. I > realized I totally forgot to machine a critical feature. The mold plate > was back on the mill running code in short order. I was working on > setting up tools for the new mill before I realized I had done something > almost automatically that used to terrify me. > > Thanks guys. >
P.S. I heat shrinked (shrunk?) a collar onto a tube for some piece of equipment the other day without even thinking about it either. The guys I was doing it for stopped next to the press when I walked out the back door. I think they thought I was starting dinner when I fired up the BBQ grill. On high with the lid closed it hits 600F pretty quick. Snatch the ring off the grill with my welding gloves, and slap it on quick.
In spite of the noise I have learned a lot from this group.
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On 6/22/2018 5:17 PM, Bob La Londe wrote:







It just seems to keep getting better. I'm just waiting for a machine to explode now.
Yesterday I needed to put a round two piece assembly on the mill suspended between two indexers and indicate it in fairly close in X. I had played with various ideas for weeks to machine in reference surfaces so I could just drop them in the vises on my big mill. Now that I am ready to do this job the big mill is apart while I decide what to do with a bad axis. I said screw it and manually cut some slots into the feet of the indexers for hold down bolts. I threw it ont eh table, took the bolts down just short of snug and eyeballed it. Then out came the test indicator and mag base. First pass showed about .001 over 6 inches. I had to do it three times because my brain didn't register it right. Heck, snug down the screws and check it again. Less than .001. Snug the screws firmly and about half thou. I never touched it after I eyeballed it. I just tightened the screws. No kidding.
A few weeks ago I got frustrated with the DRO on my lathe. I always seemed to have to get close and then measure and reset the DRO. It seemed to be mounted firmly enough, so I thought maybe its just a crappy DRO. Then I got the bright idea to snug down all the gibs. Not just so there is no slop, but so there is a little friction. Damn. It worked. Today I needed to turn down the shaft of a large reamer so I could grab it with something. I took a first cut, miced it, set the DRO and miced it when it got close. Within half a thou? HA. Within a line width. My target was .501 hot from cutting. (its gonna shrink a little when it cools) I took my finish pass at .5012 on the DRO and the mic said .501 exactly.
I still don't feel like a real machinist, but it sure feels good when things go right the first time.
For anybody who wonders if the shaft of a reamer is hard, that one sure was. It screamed when cutting with lots of oil and carbide inserts, but the surface finish is pretty good. At least as good as you get with 4140QT when you get the feed and DOC right.
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wrote:







More than once I have put the vise on the mill and when indicating the indicator shows no movement. I never can believe it so I tap one corner of the vise to get some indicator deflection. But I have put that one particular vise on that mill so many times that now it is usually within .010 when I first start indicating. Becoming a machinist happens at some time that can't be pinned down. Just one day you realize that you really can call yourself a machinist. And then later you have to admit you have become a good machinist. Eric
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snipped-for-privacy@whidbey.com on Sat, 30 Jun 2018 09:56:43 -0700 typed in rec.crafts.metalworking the following:

    Unfortunately, it also works the other way. I finally decided that after ten years of not working in the field at all "I used to be a machinist." Oh yeah, I still remember some of it, I still can think in terms of "how would I make that?", but the details of actually doing that? The "feel" for what I'm doing? I'm gonna have to start all over. If I do.
tschus pyotr
-- pyotr filipivich "With Age comes Wisdom. Although far too often, Age travels alone."
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