Cutting fluids and such

Newbie needing recommendations.
After getting the FIVE different lubricants needed for my South Bend 10" Heavy I really don't want a shelf full of various cutting / cooling /
wetting fluids as well, especially since this is a hobby and the gallon quantities will probably last me years.
I have an Accu-Finish diamond wheel grinder that should be used with a wetting agent. It's available from Accu-Finish but they have a minimum order amount and the bottles are pretty small so I'd like to get something from MSC or McMaster.
A cutting fluid is probably going to be helpful. I'll be doing mostly steel, some aluminum and brass. Cooling isn't really necessary as I can take my time. And I share my shop with my wife so it can't stink up the place.
Thanks. Steve.
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For occasional use, an aerosol can of cutting oil (for steel) from your local hardware or auto parts store will do fine. The long plastic nozzle is convenient and precise. The performance differences between it and some more expensive fluid such as Cool Tool from MSC will be insignificant for hobbyist use.
You need no fluids for brass. Tap Magic for aluminum is a good product for both machining and hand threading, but it has a fairly strong odor. Buy a small can and test it for wifey approval.
Randy

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SteveF writes:

Consider the Kool Mist system, both a lubricant and coolant. Doesn't involve big tanks of stuff or pumps, just a jug, nozzle, and shop air.

Maybe your time isn't worth it, but the cutting tools will wear longer and the results will be better if you use coolant.
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As a point of reference, I worked several years doing tool & die work where the only cutting fluids used were hand applied from an oil can during drilling/tapping/ reaming operations. Turning & milling were done dry.
Materials were most of the oil & air hardening tool steels and of course cold rolled steel, malleable cast iron (the die sets).
So it can be done, just keeping feeds/speeds within reason, have sharp tools, and good setups (rigidity of machine, etc.)
Good luck!

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I use A9 aluminum cutting fluid or what I call the "green goo" for my 6061 stuff, and Tap Magic for steels. The A9 (if hand applied) leaves your hands stinky for a long time. A9 rules for aluminum. No gummed up crap on your bit. A must for drilling / taping.
Marcel
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