Cutting Thin Brass Tube

I recently got a walking tour of a plant that manufactures truck radiators. One machine that particularly fascinated me was taking thin narrow sheet brass from rolls and forming it into oval tubes for use in the radiator core. The machine would form the tubes, solder the seam and spit out a contiuous length of tubing until the roll of material ran out. Of course, hundreds of feet of tubing are useless for radiators so the machine would cut it to a specified length and this got me to thinking (uh-oh). How does the machine cut the thin wall tubing without collapsing it? The cut ends show no burrs and are still perfectly shaped.

Reply to
John Kunkel
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Too bad you didn't think to ask while you were there. I'd be interested in hearing the answer too. Maybe a machine that deburs right afterwards?

Lane

Reply to
Lane

--I cut it with a wet abrasive cutoff saw. Leaves very little in the way of burrs, but does leave a little. In a manufacturing operation this could be down to a science and the burr all but eliminated.

Reply to
steamer

I did, but the cutoff mechanism was out of sight, buried deep in the machine and the operator didn't have a clue (nor did he seem to care).

Reply to
John Kunkel

If I was running that machine I would have to know intricate details like that. I'm just too curious.

Lane

Reply to
Lane

It may have been done by a flying rotary cutoff. That could be a slitter or slotting blade that travels diagonally for a distance at the speed of outfeed, making it's cutoff, then drops down and returns to the starting point by the time the next cut spot gets to it.

RJ

Reply to
Backlash

Many years (35) ago I worked for a steel tube manufacturer. One of the cut off machines used two blades the fist had a 30 deg. bevel which took a slice from the top of the tube. The second blade came down into the opening with a 60 deg. point to complete the cut. AFAIK these blades were of high speed steel perhaps 0.100" thick and sharpened at 90 deg. and no clearance. The night I worked on this machine, the operator and I cut, flared, inspected and packed something like seven thousand pieces of 1 1/2" tube about 8" long in about six hours. I seem to recall that this tube was something special in that it was made of two layers or something. I do remember that it was a very busy night but the production bonus rate was very good. Gerry :-)} London, Canada

Reply to
Gerald Miller

Drives me nutz.... I, myself, just gotta know how stuff works. Employees today "don't know nothin', don't wanna know nothin', ain't gonna learn nothin', where's my paycheck and how come it's so small?" Ken.

Reply to
Ken Sterling

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