Dead compressor? Help!!

Hello, I have 2 Craftsman compressors giving me the same problem. They
are as follows:
Model: 919.167240 - 15 gallons - 150PSi.
Model: 919.165500 - 33 gallons - 135PSi.
The motors/engines work but the gages don't report any pressure. Also,
after close inspection It appears to be that the tanks are in great
condition. Both these items are relativeley new and I was wondering if
anybody in this forum can suggest a way to troubleshoot these items. I
called Sears and they say they would charge me $57.99 + parts for a
minor repair or $97.95 + parts for a major repair.
Please assist. Any help will be greatly appreciated.
Thanks!
Jay
Reply to
jay.cortes
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I think that you could go a long way if you could trace your problem in a step by step manner. Check if the motors properly spin, then check that the air is sucked into intakes, whether the gauges work, etc. Is there air in the tank? If you let it out, run the compressor for a minute, and open the valve again, is there some new air?
Maybe everything is good but the gauges failed?
I suspect that you would be able to pinpoint your problem in, say, 10 minutes.
For a working compressor, motors should spin, the movement should be imparted to the pump, the valves should open and close, and the air should be passed to the tank, and should not leak out of the tank. Follow every step of this process.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus19006
Sounds like bad reed valves. If you can find out who actually made the compressors you may be able to order the parts for a few bucks. Or try a compressor shop for parts. I ended up rebuilding my three cylinder compressor with reed valves, rings, and bearings for a small amount of money. Good Luck. 73 Gary
Reply to
Gary
The maker is sears... Craftsman. Sears has an online diagram where I can order every individual part. If it turns out I have bad reed valves. Is this the equivalent of overhauling my car engine, or is it a simple procedure?
Reply to
jay.cortes
The reed plate is usually right under or a part of the cylinder head . 8 bolts on most 2 cylinder pumps .
Reply to
Snag
I think it's reed valves too...maybe an hour if you've never done it before. Dive in!
Reply to
Tom Gardner
Thanks guys... all let you all know how it turned out.
Reply to
jay.cortes
I pulled up the drawing for the first one, I have "up close and personal" experience with that compressor head. I can't say anything good about them.
The problem I've been running into is that the outlet pipe is held in place by a rubber 'O' ring (actually shaped more like a yoke) that is clamped in place by the head. It is subject to lots of heat, lots of vibration. It vulcanizes onto the head, gets brittle, and just pulls out. Life expectancy measured in months.
The motor just runs, you can hear a hissing sound, no pressure build up. You can check without dissembly by starting it up, try pushing and pulling on the copper outlet pipe. If it moves more than 1/8" or so, or pushing it in seems to give you a bit of pressure, you have the problem.
The gasket (item # 6, part number CAC-1212) runs about $5 plus $5 shipping. Not worth the $10 to install it unless you plan to dump the whole unit on some unsuspecting victim. Go to
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click on "parts", key in your model number, go to the exploded view drawing.
snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:
Reply to
RoyJ
Well, I decided to pop open the pump/motor compartment on my 919.167240. I think I found the problem. The "Timing Belt" is broken (Part AC-0815) was broken. I went to sears online and found out the price is $9.95 for the replacement. I guess this would explain why despite the motor turning no pressure would build up in the tank. Anyways, this leads me to my next question. Is installing the timing belt as simple as running it through both gears, or is it more than I'm anticipating. Please advise!!
Thanks!!
Jay
Reply to
jay.cortes
There shouldn't be any timing problems like you'd find in a car engine. Reed valves aren't going to hit a piston through being out of timing and there is no ignition to worry about. . Now if your compressor had popet valves that would be different (and much more expensive to build) 73 Gary
Reply to
Gary
Now if your compressor had
Why? The belt would be between the motor and compressor. I have never heard of any timing mechanism in a compressor. The intake valve is spring loaded and pushed open by atmospheric pressure, the outlet valve is pushed open by the compressed air Gerry :-)} London, Canada
Reply to
Gerald Miller
Popet valves and thier seats, springs, retainers, ect. cost a lot more than simple reed valves. More material and more machining.
Reply to
Gary
And easier to service and repair. My old (no, ancient - 1963) two-stage pump leaked like a seive when I got it (free, on a rusted-out tank). It took only about an hour to re-face the three leaky valves, and get the thing pumping like new again. It still had some of the honing cross-hatch on the cylinder walls!
LLoyd
Reply to
Lloyd E. Sponenburgh

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