Drill Bit Sharpening

I've read Tee-Nuts explanation of how to sharpen drill bits by hand..
(There is no way I'd manage to duplicate his technique successfully.)
I understand that the Drill Doctor works quite well, but seems like
overkill (unless you sharpen bits a lot) and not always convenient to
tote around. What about jigs and fixtures?
Has anyone used a sharpening fixture with a grinder? Any that worked
particularly well or poorly? Anyone tried the
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Reply to
Barry S.
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The only real way I have found to learn how to sharpen a drill is to have it demonstrated. Can you get someone to show you? Try a college or engineering workshop. If you ask the right person they will frequently oblige for a few minutes. Once you have the right technique, try it out at home. When you think you have got it right, ask someone again to look at the results. The things to look for are equal flute length and angles. The point should be in the centre of the drill. Make sure there is clearance all after the cutting edge. This is easy to get wrong and the drill just rubs. Unless you are into real drill sharpening, forget point thinning etc. The drill jig you posted looks like a cheap way to get most of the way to a sharp drill. Never used one myself.
John
Reply to
John Manders
This jig looks like "training wheels" for TeeNut's hand sharpening method. After you get on to it, "TeeNut's six million dollar bionic holder (your hand) replaces this fixture.
There's been mixed reviews on the drill doctor here. Some love it, some curse it.
There's also the general drill grinding attachment. Before I bought a professional drill grinder, I used this all the time. Its slow but gives perfect results. I even built my own for huge drills 3/4" - 2 1/2".
Personally, I spend one day a year getting all my drills perfectly sharpened with the fixtures, in between, I touch up with the TeeNut method.
Karl
Reply to
Karl Townsend
||I've read Tee-Nuts explanation of how to sharpen drill bits by hand.. ||(There is no way I'd manage to duplicate his technique successfully.) ||I understand that the Drill Doctor works quite well, but seems like ||overkill (unless you sharpen bits a lot) and not always convenient to ||tote around. What about jigs and fixtures?
I got a DD for Christmas a few years ago. I've probably used it 6 times. Each of those 6 times the alternative was a 30-minute trip to the store to buy a new bit. Instead, I can stop what I'm doing (trying to rub a hole in a frame section), get out the DD, sharpen the drill, and go back to work - actually *drilling* a hole now. Works for me. Texas Parts Guy
Reply to
Rex B
On Wed, 28 Jul 2004 06:55:01 GMT, Barry S. vaguely proposed a theory ......and in reply I say!:
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There is no overkill sharpening bits over 6mm. Either learn how, or buy the DD. Drill bits are $$. A blunt bit is not a PITA; it's useless, in metalwork.
Throwing metal at metal is a very stupid, and therefore demanding, task.
I got lucky, I sussed out how to sharpen by hand, on a belt sander. It took a few failed tries. I stil get failures. I rely on my school and post-school lessons about attack angles, shoulder angles, point lengths (yes drill points have a length, forget the Physics ) etc to get close to what I need. The DD would _preumably_ allow for such stuff? But if it does, you still need to know what you want for a job.
Hand sharpening is an art. It is an art that asks very unart-like results.
But in the end, if you buy drillbits that are any good, sharpening becaomes a major part of working with them.
***************************************************** It's not the milk and honey we hate. It's having it rammed down our throats.
Reply to
Old Nick
The Drill Doctor works fairly well, but has one other huge advantage.
You can use the DD as a teacher. It will show you proper finished results. Once you see how the DD does it, you might be able to do it by hand.
Works for me.
Reply to
frank
Good point.. Might just do that.
I had a welding instructor briefly show me how to sharpen drill bits at one time, but it didn't stick in my mind. Kind of wish I could borrow Teenut and his $6M bionic holder for a couple of hours, but thats not possible.
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Reply to
Barry S.
the DD is worth the money if only in that it can save aggravation when you are just needing to get the hole done and your last bit of that size got bunged up. The results are ok but not "professional". It'll cut a good hole after sharpening but not as good as a top quality off the shelf bit.
Where the DD really shines is with the "bulk" bits that one can often get on e-bay or Boeing Surplus. For a buck or less a pound, you can get a ton of usable bits which can be "bulk" sharpened at one time. These tend to be weird sizes but are great when you just need to whip out a hole. Having a handful of bits about the size you need can really speed up rough work jobs that have a bunch of holes. Also, it's a lot easier on the wallet when drilling nasty materials or those places (through welds and such) where you hate to use the expensive quality bits.
Koz
Barry S. wrote:
Reply to
Koz
How does it work on the smaller sizes? It claims to work down to 3/32". Does it really? I can usually manage to sharpen a 1/2" drill freehand, but drills under a 1/4" get frustrating...
Reply to
John Ings
I've not had good results with bits smaller than 3/16", so they just go in a box when replaced. Someday I might figure it out with the DD, learn to do it freehand, or discover some other jig. Other than that, I've got sharp drill bits for my work and touching them up is very quick.
If you're near the Twin Cities in MN, swing by and try it out on a couple of bits.
Pete
Reply to
Pete Bergstrom
[ ... ]
The smaller the drill bit, the worse the job that it does. Those up around 3/8" and above, it will even do the split point sharpening (with a bit of care), but with the ones under 1/4" it just plain won't work for split points.
I have a Drill Doctor, and use it for bits from just above 1/4" up to 3/4".
For smaller ones -- 1/4" on down to #70, what I use is a drill sharpening grinder made by DuMore. Unfortunately, it is no longer made, and I had to make several replacement parts for mine, including a few starter collets, before I got a nearly complete set from an eBay auction. (It uses a separate collet for each size of drill bit -- not to grip it, but to steady it near the grinding wheel.
It is a combination of a grinder and the General drill sharpening fixture (also made by many others) turned on its side, and adding an optical system to help set the flute angle properly to start.
Enjoy, DoN.
Reply to
DoN. Nichols

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