electronic edge finders

Can anyone advise me how best to use these. I am concerned that when finding the edge it may be possible to over run and damage the finder or
does it allow for some over run as in the case of a dial indicator. Any advice appreciated.
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Graham Howe mail: ( snipped-for-privacy@mcb.net)
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Mine is a .400 ball a spring pulls the ball to its locating seat .Its spring loaded so when your do over run it the ball will move and then reseat itself.
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Yeah, and they aren't electronic, either. They have a battery and small light bulbs. No rocket science there. Upon contact with a metallic surface, the light comes on. Mine is not forgiving for over run. You should never have to worry about over run if you approach the target edge carefully and slowly. The range of "off" to full "on" is less than a thou on mine.
Bob Swinney

spring
itself.
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Sounds easy enough to make your own then. Does it rely on electrical contact and is that reliable? I assume it's not much use on plastics etc.
John
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John sez:

still have to approach construction with as much skill and accuracy you'd use in any other.

electrical contact. It is reliable from the standpoint that the contact area is very small and that surface contamination (oil, etc.) is easily cut through by the small contacting surfaces.

Bob Swinney

edge
thou
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I just discovered how to really use my wobbler type finder and can't imagine anything better or cheaper.

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imagine
I love my wiggler...but sometimes it requires a little too much height....been wondering if someone makes a stubby electronic edge finder for cases where you don't have enough clearance for the wiggler to work.
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On Fri, 27 Feb 2004 14:06:06 GMT, "Tom Gardner"

I scored a brand new Starrett wobbler set, never used, and Ive still never used it myself. One of these days Ill have to get out the instructions and try it.
Gunner

"To be civilized is to restrain the ability to commit mayhem. To be incapable of committing mayhem is not the mark of the civilized, merely the domesticated." - Trefor Thomas
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wrote:

imagine
Wigglers are most useful with the point, especially if you do work from a layout. For edge finding, I prefer a 1/2" diameter spring loaded edge finder. The action is crisp and reliable, but you have to run the edge finder at the appropriate speed.
You don't need much in the way of instruction with a wiggler. When you make contact with a part, the wiggler end will rotate about center, closing down the arc until you reach the point where the contact end, be it the ball or disk, is in full contact with the part. Any further movement will force the wiggler off center and it will either ride up on the part until it shoulders out, or it moves above the part and swings about. At that point the centerline of the spindle is half he diameter of the contact end of the wiggler from the edge of the part.
It's a good idea to set your dial, or DRO, then repeat to see if it swings out at the same point. It's easy to over ride the edge the first time. That's true of either type of edge finder.
Harold
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