Kennedy drawer felt replacement question

I am going to put new 'felt' in the drawers of a Kennedy tool box.
I would appreciate it if someone, who has done this successfully,
could advise me as the these best type of glue to use?
Also, are there any tricks to getting the 'felt' nicely stretched out,
so that I get a professional looking finish?
Your help will be appreciated.
Lewis.
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Reply to
Lewis Campbell
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Contact cement is good.
You can also consider cork. See:
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Regards,
Boris Mohar
Got Knock? - see: Viatrack Printed Circuit Designs
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Reply to
Boris Mohar
Lot of guys just use rubber sheeting of various kinds. I got a lot of use out of the mat from an exercise treadmill once ..
GWE
Reply to
Grant Erwin
I don't care for felt in my chest drawers for a couple of reasons. It's usually dark in color and it picks up dirt and grease too readily.
I used table cloth padding to line my drawers. Its the stuff that is used to protect the top of your dining table. It is vinyl on one side and foam plastic on the other. You can get it in bulk at fabric shops. I use it foam side down.
I use white material, that way small items such as test indicator stylii are easily visible. The vinyl stays relatively clean and when it does get soiled it's easy to wipe clean.
Maybe I'm lazy, but I've never found it necessary to glue it down. The rough foam gets a good "purchase" on the old felt, underneath and stays put.
Regards,
Orrin
Reply to
Orrin Iseminger
Rubbermaid, I think, makes rolls of rubbery, mesh-like material for lining drawers, shelves, etc.
Reply to
randy replogle
I've done felt a couple times. Last time I used a light blue that small things show up well on. Cut the felt almost to size, staying a bit small. It stretches *very* easily and from smoothing out can get bigger than you want. 3M 77 is what I used IIRC. I did this in my roller box for machinist tools and it hasn't gotten particulary dirty after *many* years.
michael
Reply to
michael
I used 3M 77 to glue the felt to a piece of heavy paper, then turned the whole assembly over and marked the paper with the outline of the bottom of the drawer. Then score the paper on the lines, trim the paper outside the lines to the same height as the drawer sides, cut the little corners out, fold and place in the drawer. You can secure the sides with a little glue at the top edge. It works well and makes it easy to remove if and when you need to replace it.
Reply to
Paul G. Shultz
Well ... I have found, at Home Despot, some prepared felt drawer liner -- a nice bright green, so it contrasts well with everything except verdigris (sp?), and supplied with an adhesive already present on the back surface. Anyway, it looks a lot nicer than the brown felt which is often used.
I've used this to re-line some nice old wooden machinists cabinets which I have gotten in eBay auctions, and in local estate sales. (I wish that I had been able to meet the ex-owners of these, but an estate sale is a bit too late.)
Good Luck, DoN.
Reply to
DoN. Nichols
The felt used is typically not the soft stretchy type. Gerstner will sell you pre-cut felt for their toolboxes, which is stiff. It can be applied directly with little to no smoothing necessary. The size you need is likely to be different, but perhaps you can find the same type material. They may even help you in that regard. Gerstner used to use a nice green color (maybe they still do, dunno), which I find attractive. If you keep your tools clean, it's not a problem keeping the stuff clean. I've owned my current Gerstner (my second) for 36 years and the felt is still in good condition and clean enough to not be concerned. By the way, I purchased my first Gerstner, the 26" wide model, in 1957, new, for $75, directly from a dealer. Have you priced them lately? Gasp!!
Harold
Reply to
Harold & Susan Vordos
I did my old Scherr toolbox with purple felt from the local fabric store. Something different, you might say....
Jim
Reply to
jim rozen
Don't forget to multilply that number by at *least* ten to account for inflation. I would say that they're about the "same" price, maybe a bit less.
Jim
Reply to
jim rozen
Contact someone that re-covers pool tables. They will give (?) you an old felt which is perfect for the drawer bottoms. I used rubber cement and it worked fine.
Good Luck, BilM
Reply to
Bilmundus
Excellent!! idea. Bravo!
Gunner
"This phenomena occurs in many voting precincts, especially near Chicago. Democrat voters are so loyal in some areas that they continue to vote for decades after their deaths. Since most of these deceased Democrats surely vote from Hell, this leads one to wonder about the accommodations made between the Democrat National Party and The Devil. Perhaps this is best reflected in the hook nosed, pointy eared, Herman Munster looking candidate the Democrats choose to run for President this year." Strider
Reply to
Gunner
Yep! Shocking realization, isn't it? After reading your post I started comparing prices of many items. Housing, cars, trucks, fuel. Times ten seems to be quite accurate. Even for gold, which fluctuates wildly.
Bottom line? The American dollar isn't worth much anymore.
Harold
Reply to
Harold & Susan Vordos
Well heck, at least the government understand this and has reduced the taxes we pay by a like amount, to compensate for the fact that we're all in a ten-times higher tax bracket.
(!)
Jim
Reply to
jim rozen
Chuckle! Well, not quite *all* of us are. My income has been drastically reduced since retirement.
It's really scary to reflect on the old tax structure. I recall that when one had a taxable income near a million, the percentage paid in taxes was something like 90%. Talk about getting screwed!
Harold
Reply to
Harold & Susan Vordos

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