EPDM rubber for hanging trailer license plates

My license plate is supposed to be mounted underneath the left light, which has a special provision for illuminating the license plate. That
would place the plate very low with very low clearance. That means that if I, say, back over a curb or some such, I would not damage the lights, but I would damage the license plate. So, I decided to hang it on something flexible so that it would flex away rather than bend or break.
After looking around, etc, I decided to buy "EPDM rubber sheet" from McMaster. That's black, 3/16" thick rubber. It possesses some very amazing properties -- it is clean, does not mar, it is very soft and flexible and yet very tough. I will hang my license plate on two 2x4 inch pieces of this rubber, I would bolt the rubber both to the truck bracket as well as to the license plate.
This material is highly recommended. I paid about $9 for a 12x12 sheet, and so far used only 16 square inches from 144 square inches total. I am sure that I will find more uses for this wonderful material over the years.
i
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Ignoramus30656 wrote:

It sounds flexible enough so that on the highway the air would push your license plate back so it would fly behind the trailer like a flag. This would really catch the attention of any State Patrol in the area. A better solution would be to mount the whole fixture higher up, but then I have a really poor understanding of the problem.
GWE
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"Grant Erwin" wrote: (clip) This would really catch the attention of any State Patrol in the area. (clip) ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ I would expect thast it would not only catch their attention, but elicit their admiration.
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On Thu, 15 Feb 2007 05:41:01 GMT, "Leo Lichtman"

and probably give you a citation of admiration.
Gunner
"Liberalism is a philosophy of consolation for Western civilization as it commits suicide" - James Burnham
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Gunner, your too much!
LOL
Jay Cups
Gunner wrote:

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Grant, I will see how it goes, I hope that it will not be that flexible. The distance from the bottom of plate to ground would be about 6-8 inches.
i
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On Wed, 14 Feb 2007 23:46:32 -0600, Ignoramus30656

Hi Iggy,
I haven't seen your set-up, but the license plate on my motorcycle is lit from below. Do you have room to just flip the tail-lamp over so the license plate is mounted above rather than below?
Just a thought...
--
Leon Fisk
Grand Rapids MI/Zone 5b
  Click to see the full signature.
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Your idea is great, but, unfortunately, I do not have room for that.
i
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Snow
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Ignoramus30656 wrote:

Good way to loose the trailer plate. I lose one that broke off a similar commercial mount somewhere along a 100 mile trip. Had to get a new plate issued since there was little hope of finding the old one.
Ignore the tail light all together and get a standalone surface mount plastic license plate frame with integral lighting and mount it up on the tailgate of the trailer.
You may be able to just surface mount the plate on the trailer depending on the regs in your area since I believe trailer plates aren't required to be lighted in many places.
The trailer I rented from United Rentals a short while ago had it's plate mounted vertically to the fender surface and even bent to fit the fenders profile. No lights there either.
Pete C.
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Hm, then, I could just bolt it to my tailgate and be done with it.
i
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[snip]

I'd bolt it to mine but often, since it is a loading ramp, I leave it at home. A Saturn SL1 will only pull so much.
Wes
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The last "flexable" mount I made for something came from the two-ply, cord-reinforced, sidewall of a junk tire.
Cost = $0
I can easily envision a license plate mount cut out with a sharp (new blade) utility knife using rubber lube or even plain water as a lubricant.
Want something a little stronger? .....cut a piece out of the steel-belted tread.
Most of your "universal" exhaust hangers are made from junk tire carcasses also.
Not a great reason to keep a pile of junk tires around, but one or two can sometimes come in handy.
If the neighbors don't want to see a couple of junk tires outside your shop, cut them apart into three pieces - two sidewall rings and one tread strip - which also makes a nice floor mat when wired together with other tread strips.....
....plus, once you cut tires down, the leftover pieces - technically, no longer a tire - fit into one of those large "construction" plastic rubbish bags for easy disposal in the dumpster.
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Flapping license plates are a solid no. Mounting on the tail gate is a no, sometimes the tail gate it down, sometimes it is removed. Mounting it low is a no (ditto the tail lights)), too much tendency to remove it when backing up to pick up something. Mount it on the fenders, up high and out of harm's way. Igonore the lighted plate requirement, it's better to have a plate that is still there and can be read than to have it lighted. Only excpetion is for the day that you get an inspection.
Ignoramus30656 wrote:

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My solution was to relocate both lights and plate to the fenders. The kit had the lights(and plate) mounted to the frame, hanging under it, guaranteed to get nailed when the pins were pulled and the bed was tipped. In fact, it happened once before I could find some brackets to mount them on the fenders. Now all I have to watch out for is getting too close on the left side, plate is lighted, doesn't flap in the breeze, doesn't get folded in half length-wise when the bed is tipped. The brackets I used were some powder-coated shelf brackets courtesy of the local True Value. Drilled three holes in fender and bracket, took a couple of hours to relocate the wiring and get the lights mounted, no more worries.
Stan
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Would not work with my fenders, but what you did made a lot of sense.
i
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On Wed, 14 Feb 2007 23:00:44 -0600, Ignoramus30656

Bolt plate to steel out of harm's way, provide a white LED for plate illumination and fuggedaboud the "licence plate light" in the taillight.
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