Fred Flintstone Milling

Today I had to mount some new tooling to an assembly fixture at work. One problem, there was metal in the way that would have been easy to remove on a milling machine
but I can't fit the fixture in the mill nor take the time to rip it completely apart to transport the detail that needs rework.
So, I resorted to those cold chisel things that came with my assortments of pin punches. I read once that key ways were often cut with chisels so I figured hell, I've done some woodworking with wood chisels, I'll give it a shot.
It worked out better than I thought it would but now I pose the question. Back in the day when they actually cut a key seat this way, what did the chisel look like at the pointy end? Like the typical cold chisel or more like a wood chisel? Hell, anything informative on the subject of machining with a hammer and chisel would be interesting.
Sorry for the on topic post but I can't resist asking.
Wes
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The key seat chisel I have in my tool box has a end quite similar to a key seat cutter tooth. One of the few times I used it was to cut a slot in a hydraulic piston nut so I could unscrew it from the rod. Slow tedious work. Steve
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For keyways, look up cape chisel.
Here's one site (scroll down past the woodworking chisels)
http://www.using-tools.com/chisels.htm
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I don't have an authoritative answer, but I have seen this done with a chisel ground to look like a tool you'd use in a shaper. The job was putting a new keyway on the end of a crankshaft to advance the cam timing by something less than a full gear tooth. I don't remember why it was decided to do it on the crank rather than broaching a new keyway in the gear, but there was a reason. This was thirty-odd years ago (some years more odd than others).
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On Wed, 13 Oct 2010 18:52:26 -0400, Wes wrote:

Hey, get real good with hammer and chisel, and you might turn out to be the next Michaelangelo! "Well, I took this big block of marble, and just cut away everything that didn't look like David." ;-)
Cheers! Rich
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I once had an ancient [circa 1800's] metal planner with a bed width of 6 inches. The oil channels on the ways were like a sine wave all hand cut with a chisel. The ability to use a chisel in this manner as well as the ability to use scrapers is what separates the men from the boys.
CP
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Here's something I found on YouTube:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_5IV8kXJTQo&feature=related

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Wes wrote in rec.crafts.metalworking on Wed, 13 Oct 2010 18:52:26 -0400:

I did similar a few weeks ago. I needed a square hole to take the shank of a carriage bolt. I looked for a square file, but couldn't find any. But I did find a chisel. Worked much better than I would have thought. By the time I did the forth one, it was easy.
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northshore MA.
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dan wrote:

About 15 years ago I needed to run sone new 25 pair telephone cables in a radio station without putting them off the air. The only spot to run the cable already had one cable, with no room to run another. The were stunned when they came back and I had use a small cold chisel to enlarge the hole around the existing cable, trough a concrete block. I never did tell them how I got that nice square hole to pull the extra three cables. Wrong tool, wrong application but a perfect install of three more studio telephones! ;-)
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wrote:

Explain that it's a special cordless impact tool designed just for this sort of situation. A slight surcharge on the bill, but everything will be good as gold and you'll be up and running in a jiffy...
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"Denis G." wrote:

I only charged a surcharge when they wanted to watch me work. :)
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On Thu, 14 Oct 2010 20:03:14 -0700 (PDT), "Denis G."

Like my collection of cordless drills downstairs with the big crown gear with a crank attached, and those extended "U" shaped devices with a knob on one crossbar and a funny tool holder on the other. :-)} Gerry :-)} London, Canada
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And you get more exercise and muscle control using a bit brace -- something you can't claim with cordless drills. Well, at least they can make time for exercise at the gym ..
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On Wed, 13 Oct 2010 18:52:26 -0400, Wes

Look up cape chisel.
Chisels are capable of surprisingly precise work in the right hands. An engineer and colleague I knew in the '60's, one Leonid Riobokin, had been trained in the Ukraine in the 50's. His engineering training included how to pour babbit bearings for tractors and how to make holes for tube sockets in sheetmetal with a chisel.
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snipped-for-privacy@NOSPAMgoldengate.net says...

Based on what I've seen of their products, I would have given quite a lot to attend a Soviet engineering school. I wonder if the ones in Russia are still of the same quality or whether they've gotten the Western disease of mostly book-learning and little hands-on.
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    [ ... ]

    Check out "cape chisel" at this site:
    <http://www.using-tools.com/chisels.htm
    If your set of pin punches is like mine, there is one cold chisel and one cape chisel in there -- so you probably got the right tool the first try.
    Now that you know the name -- do a Google search to find more details. Some of what I found was links to PDF files which were awkward to get the URL -- but the PDF had good information, including other uses of the cape chisels that I did not know of.

    I think that I can forgive you. I don't know whether the political debaters can, however. :-)
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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On 10/14/2010 12:29 AM, DoN. Nichols wrote:

so THAT is what that funny chisel is! Had one for 20 years, never knew exactly what it was good for.
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On Thu, 14 Oct 2010 05:29:22 +0000, DoN. Nichols wrote:

Right-click on the link, and in the popup context menu, select "copy link location".
Then paste it wherever you want. :-)
Hope This Helps! Rich
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Rich Grise wrote:

You might want to first go to www.tinyurl.com and "shrink" the long URL into something which will fit on one line of a newsgroup post or an e-mail.
Jeff
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All the old machinists' training books have a chapter on chiseling and filing. Was a whole lot easier back then, grey cast iron was about like chiseling wood, if it wasn't chilled, and wrought iron was even softer. So using a cape chisel to cut a key seat in a wrought iron shaft wasn't too tough and gouging a mating groove in the pulley that went on it was not much tougher. Key was filed to fit after. Now that most, if not all, cast iron widgets have some sort of alloying elements in them and wrought iron is but a memory, chiseling like that doesn't have a whole lot of uses. Stuff is cast a lot closer to needed size now, too. One of the exercises I remember from a 1905 Audels was chiseling a set of parallel grooves in a cast iron block using a cape chisel, then using a broader one to remove the strips, was supposed to be like prepping the slide valve surface on a locomotive cylinder casting. I imagine even then they'd use a shaper or planer for such things but there was always a certain amount of old- timey processes that apprentices were subjected to.
There are a bunch of those old 19th and early 20th century machine shop books on archive.org with a lot of pointers to google books. Lotsa winter reading!
Stan
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