friction welding

A few weeks/months/years ago someone posted a site in the UK that had some
videos about metal working. One of the videos featured welding and showed
axles housings being friction welded on what looked like a lathe type unit.
I was wondering if it would be possible to do that on a modified lathe. Has
anyone ever seen this done?
I am sort of looking at a hardinge chucker which seems like it would be
ideal to do this. Not really sure I absolutely have to do this nor need to,
but I really dig tools and making stuff :)
Thanks
Oliver
Reply to
V8TR4
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You probably can't do truck axle housings on a standard lathe, but many people have done one-off and small runs of axle shafts, extended drill shanks, engine valves and all sorts of things on standard lathes and drill presses. What they do is apply force to squeeze the parts together, and when the heat is right, they shut off the motor and let the parts slow down. Too much inertia will break the weld when the metal freezes. Apparently, once you've done a few and get the feel of the technique, it is fairly easy to do.
Jon
Reply to
Jon Elson
I think there is a big flywheel involved, spun up perty fast, the parts brought together under considerable pressure, the joint gets red/white hot then a buncha pressure applied until it stops. Hi-temp engine valve stems are done this way.
V8TR4 wrote:
Reply to
Jerry Wass
I did friction welding on my 10EE. Takes a LOT of RPM and force. I found that a butt weld was impossible. I made an interference fit and spun the parts until they slid together - great weld. This was welding an extension onto a drill bit. I used the same idea to weld a side shield on a spool to the arbor.
Karl
Reply to
Karl Townsend
Hey Karl,
I don't follow the part about " weld a side shield on a spool to the arbor." Wuzzatmeen???
Take care.
Brian Lawson, Bothwell, Ontario. XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX
Reply to
Brian Lawson
Just one of my projects that I used friction welding for. Think of a very small wire spool, or reel. I made one for holding rolls of PLU stickers for packing apples. My spool had side sheilds of 1/16" steel - they were 3" in diameter. Each shield was friction welded to part of the arbor with an interference fit. I made the unit so two quick turns would undo the two halves so you can quickly put in a new roll of PLU stickers.
The PLU sticker is that little ID sticker on each apple. My machine to apply them is probably worthy of a patent, but the market (other growers) is too small to ever make a profit.
Karl
Reply to
Karl Townsend
Hey Karl,
OK. Thanks. Because the thread had gone onto friction welding in the lathe, I took "the arbor" to be the tail-stock for some reason.
Take care.
Brian Lawson, Bothwell, Ontario. XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX
Reply to
Brian Lawson

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