fuel leak

We have an old ford 8N tractor that is used like a golf cart. Probably
started and moved an average of ten times a day. It has always had a
devilish leak in the carburetor. The gas valve is SUPPOSED to be turned off
after every use, but it don't happen. I just filled the tank last week. I
went out an hour ago and the entire tank had leaked on the ground.
Can anyone suggest a 12 volt gas valve that can be installed to turn off
when the key is off. Or, do fuel pumps include a valve - turn pump off and
fuel flow is checked.
Reply to
Karl Townsend
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That's not a 6V system? These valves are probably not recommended for gasoline by the mfr, but I wouldn't be too concerned on a tractor as long as the wetted parts are compatible with gas.
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My Farmall Super-A has the same problem. I need to tear the carb down before winter.
Ned Simmons
Reply to
Ned Simmons
Only $32, less than the cost of one tank. Thanks.
I changed all my 6V tractors over to 12V. Just get a GM alternator and ignitiion coil. Toss the old generator, regulator, coil, and lights. The old starter works just fine. The tractor gets the "hand me down" batteries from the car and pickup. Now that tractor starts in seconds at -45F after sitting for a month. I tried it last time we hit that temp. On two of the tractors, and the forklift, I also installed electronic ignition. REALLY helps cold starting.
Karl
Reply to
Karl Townsend
Most of the older tractors Ive seen have a shutoff valve coming out of the fuel tank. They use gravity feed to the carborator.
John
Reply to
John
You need to rebuild the carb, the needle valve is leaking or the float sticks. It's cheap & easy and will stop your leaks. I almost never shut the gas valve and have no leaks.
Reply to
Nick Hull
Been there done that. no joy. Me thinks there must be a hair line crack in the carb someplace that lets it leak.
Karl
Reply to
Karl Townsend
Better find that leak & fix it or you might be riding on a fireball one day.
Reply to
Nick Hull
"Karl Townsend" wrote in message news:ekQCg.2225$ snipped-for-privacy@newsread3.news.pas.earthlink.net...
Karl, you missed Henry Ford's whole point! Gauges and lights were kind of expensive when the 8N/9N series were made. They needed an annunciator of some sort to tell you that the reserve valve/fuel valve under the tank isn't closed.
The fuel smell IS the annunciator!
Hell... ALL 8N carbs leak. Usually its around the bottom-most jet screw.
FWIW... most vibratory style electric fuel pumps (solenoid type) have a strong enough spring on the check valve so that it acts like a poppet, and will probably stop your leak.
However, there are ways to correct the problem, rather than just work around it. I kept and _heavily_ used a 1948 8N for over ten years, starting in 1988. We mowed 10 acres twice a month with it, all year long except October through December. The only replacement parts I ever needed were a new spark coil, a generator, and a lift cylinder gasket (easy to replace, too!).
The one thing that made that old tractor run better than anything, though, was a paint job!
LLoyd
Reply to
Lloyd E. Sponenburgh
On that 8N, it's not just a "shutoff valve". Ford figured out the oriface at 1/4 turn open just exactly right for the valve to act as a "reserve valve" too. Open it 1/4 turn to run. When it spits, open it the rest of the way, and you have about five minutes more run time.
LLoyd
Reply to
Lloyd E. Sponenburgh
Got a bike wrecker near you? Lots of vacuum operated fuel valves on motorcycle gas tanks in the last 20 years.
Then the fuel flow would be reliant on the engine running. The valves usually have either a prime or reserve selection to get fuel into the carb after a long down time.
Cheers Trevor Jones
Reply to
Trevor Jones
fix the leak!
Reply to
Stealth Pilot
Karl
Any place that installs dual fuel propane systems for vehicles will have 12v fuel solenoid valves that will do exactly what you want. These valves are used to shut off the gasoline flow when switching over to propane. Most larger propane dealers sell or have access to the conversion kits and can provide such a valve. I have also purchased the them on Ebay. There is a used one for a motorcycle on Ebay right now that would probably work:
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Reply to
craftsman_ron
Karl
Any place that installs dual fuel propane systems for vehicles will have 12v fuel solenoid valves that will do exactly what you want. These valves are used to shut off the gasoline flow when switching over to propane. Most larger propane dealers sell or have access to the conversion kits and can provide such a valve. I have also purchased the them on Ebay. There is a used one for a motorcycle on Ebay right now that would probably work:
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Reply to
craftsman_ron
Get a motorcycle vacuum petcock. Petcock is on only when there is vacuum. No wires, one line to intake manifold.
Can get this at any motorcycle junkyard and you have your choice of mounts. I believe they also have inline ones as well.
Bart D. Hull snipped-for-privacy@inficad.com Tempe, Arizona
Check
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my Subaru Engine Conversion Check
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Tango II I'm building.
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Karl Townsend wrote:
Reply to
Bart D. Hull
Ned Simmons wrote in article ...
Can I send this in as a "Tip of the Month" to "Mother Earth News" and "The Organic Farmer" ?
I'm sure they will agree that such a small amount of gasoline leaking into the ground is insignificant.......not to mention the fire hazard presented by gasoline leaking near a running engine.
Reply to
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Float may be set too high, bringing the fuel level to the top of the nozzle or a bit higher, causing it to dribble.
Dan
Reply to
Dan_Thomas_nospam

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