Garvin Mill Table Repair

Just dropped some photos of my Garvin Horizontal Mill into the dropBox
in hopes that someone could recommend some repair options for the
clearly "Used" table. I have a hunch finding an original in good shape
would be near impossible !
Thanks,
Chris L
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Chris L
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Chris,
It does not look that bad to me. I would leave it alone. If you do fill it with welding or plasma spray (I think that is the name), make sure the alloy used can be machined afterwards. I was involved with filling the holes in a old drill press table, and the material was so hard that we could not machine it afterwards. We still need to get it ground flat.
Vince
Chris L wrote:
Reply to
Vince Iorio
I wouldn't monkey with it. While unsightly, it doesn't seem to limit your clamping options that much. With risks like warpage, cracking and hardspots that'll keep you from machining your tee slot, I don't think it is worth it. Use like that for a while, chances are you'll find another Garvin for parts for less money than the repair.
If you want to go the tooling plate route, go to:
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That shows the plate I put on my little Rockford. I made it out of some 1/2" Starrett precision ground mild steel flat stock I scrounged on Ebay.
I used two 5/8" round pins to register it in the tee slot and the socket head flat heads to bolt it down.
Don't agonize too much about the hole pattern, no matter which one you choose, you're bound to find setups that don't work easily.
Paul K. Dickman
Chris L wrote in message ...
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Paul K. Dickman
Paul K. Dickman wrote in message ...
Make that;
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snipped-for-privacy@ameritech.net/detail?.dir=/My+Pho tos&.dnm=Mvc-714f.jpg
Reply to
Paul K. Dickman
I guess could just "fill" some of the low diggers with JB weld as another kind individual mentioned, but I do have a split along one of the T-Slots that is causing a section of the table along the back edge to ride high. I could go in with some real thin abrasive wheels (dremel) and literally open the crack up, so nothing can be "hanging" between the two layers and hopefully it would go back down to level. I could Fill the gap with JB weld and Then just never clamp there.
I never worked with Moglice (yet), but the way that is supposed to stick to clean metal, maybe that would be a great filler ?
That seems like a long shot... I've only heard from one other Garvin owner, and his machine looks nothing like mine, Mine does not really look like any on the UK machine site, and what are the odds another one would turn up ?
Nice looking little Mill ! I assume yours too was a flat belt drive at one time ? Did you hang a bracket on the side of the machine to hold the motor ? I plan on putting my motor directly on top, using the 3.25" ram as a place to make some split collar mounting clamps.
I think the "Plate" method is probably the best way to go at this point.
Thanks, Chris L
Reply to
Chris L
Chris L wrote in message ...
Oh, you have a torn tee slot. That's a problem. Have you tried a sharp rap with a hammer to set it back down. Not to bend it, mind you, but to get to jump back into place.
parts >for less money than the repair.
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The previous owner mounted the motor and fitted the vbelt pulley The motor mount is hinged to the bottom of the drip tray beneath the mill. There is a jackshaft with an 8-1 pulley reduction before it gets to the steppulleys.
Most of the time, it has the vise in it, which keys into the tee slot. so the plate sits in an ammo can. The main advantage to the plate, for me, was that I only had one teeslot in the table. It was nearly impossible to make a setup where the clamps weren't in the way.
Paul K. Dickman
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Paul K. Dickman
"Paul K. Dickman" snipped-for-privacy@ameritech.net
To get it functional is a problem, though. I have no clue. But you can weld it with Ni rod. I build an ancient mill table up that way. But it didn't have a cracked tee slot. Frank Morrison
Reply to
Fdmorrison
"Paul K. Dickman" wrote in message
I sure did.... But not much for any movement. I think there is clearly some "chippage" in between from when it happened, or possibly dirt drifted in over the years, maybe even rust expansion ? (snip)
Is that motor a 1725 RPM or 3 phase 1100 type ? Being a bit new to this horizontal aspect, I'm curious as to what RPM I should be shooting for. I'm sure there is information out there for me, just didn't get looking yet.
(snip)
I've seen that single "T" slot on some small machines. Always thought it would be tricky to clamp various things on it.
I think I will slice out that tore T-slot edge and weld it up with NI rod like Frank suggested (Thanks Frank !). At least then it might take a little tension if I need to clamp there, and if all else fails, I'll throw the Tooling Plate over the whole thing.
Thanks for your and everyones input !
Chris L
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Chris L
Chris L wrote in message ...
With a 7/8" arbor the standard cutter dia is about 2 1/2" Using 80 sfm as an average speed for HSS cutter in steel (it can be 1/2 to 2 times that depending on the steel and depth of cut).that works out to:
120 rpm
2 1/2 times that for brass 300 rpm
5 times that for aluminum 600 rpm
When I got it, my mill had a 1725 rpm motor with a jackshaft reduction of 8 to 1, and a step pulley range of 2 to1 to 1 to 2. Original range 100 - 430 rpm
I scrounged a 1/2 horse dc 1720 motor with a controller and decided to use that. I changed the jackshaft ratio to 4 to 1 for a theoretical range of 1 to 800 rpm. In reality the range is more like 40 to 600 rpm.
It's a little slow when using an endmill in it but it has worked out quite well
Paul K. Dickman
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Paul K. Dickman

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