Gas welding questions

Hello all,
I just purchased a Victor Advantage II torch outfit. I am now learning that this is considered a "light duty" rig. I did some gas welding many
many years ago and do remember using different size torches but never gave it much thought.
The specs indicate that it: "Welds up to 1/2 in. with optional nozzles", "Cuts up to 6 in. with optional tips"
The thickest I can ever conceive of welding is 3/16", maybe 1/4" and cutting 1/2" max. So it would seem I got a good rig for my needs..
Any comments?? What about tank sizes? I am thinking the M size Oxygen tank with a #4 Acetylene tank..
Thanks for any tips! Fred
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Normally you buy a set of tanks used from some guy down on his luck and what he had, you get. If you have to pick your own tank sizes, then you need to think about the trade-offs. It's convenient to have smaller tanks as they require less space in a small shop and they are a lot easier to move. However, they require more frequent filling and I suspect many welding stores charge more per cubic foot for a small tank than a large one (although I don't have any data to support this).
I have an M sized oxygen tank (125 cu. ft., 47" tall, 7" diameter) and a #3 acetylene tank (75 cu. ft., 29" tall, 7" dia.) and I find it convenient to have both tanks the same diameter. I live about 2 miles from the nearest welding gas vendor and when I need to transport my tanks to be refilled I do it with my car on a little rack I built:
http://www.tinyisland.com/tankframe.html
Grant
Fred wrote:

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So just out of curiousity is anyone stupid enough to tailgate you when you have those tanks on the back or do they tend to hang back a few hundred feet.
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I haven't noticed much difference in the driving behavior of those behind me when I'm driving with my tanks "out". But I live in a pretty genteel neighborhood (at least compared to where I used to live). - GWE
Blazing Bumpers wrote:

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On Thu, 08 Jan 2004 11:15:47 -0800, Grant Erwin

Have you seen the "Victor compatible" OA guage/hose sets on Ebay for $30? What do you think of them?

What does it cost for refilling them?

Saaaaay, isn't that a Ford Exploder? <bseg> Is that rig WA-OSHA approved?
-------------------------------------------- Proud (occasional) maker of Hungarian Paper Towels. http://www.diversify.com Comprehensive Website Design =====================================================
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If you are not going to do heavy welding or cutting, the rig will be fine. Victor is a good set, and will last a long time. They are easy to get serviced, too. You will arrive at the answers you asked about the tanks by observance. If you use up your gas too fast, and are finding yourself going to get gas too often, you can buy more tanks or larger tanks. If you transport them around a lot, you might opt for the lighter smaller tanks, and get a couple of each. If it stays in the shop, you might opt for larger ones. If you don't use them much, you might be fine with what you have. You can see a lot by observing. Most suppliers will trade you up to the larger tanks and give you credit for trading in the smaller ones. They want to sell you the GAS.
re: transporting ............
Secure them. From a safety standpoint, but also because you can cause damage that will cost you to have repaired. If you don't have them secured, DO NOT transport them with the regulators on them, or you risk buggering up your nice Victors. If there are not local laws, and you have a kind county mounty, don't worry about the naysayers and paranoid people who will be honking at you and flashing their lights. Hairspray is more dangerous and hurts more people annually than welding gases transported in cars. But for your own safety, and peace in the neighborhood, secure them, or at least shut your trunk lid.
Steve
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"light duty" has more to do with the single stage regulators than the absolute capacity of the torch handle/hoses/regulators. high gas flow thru those regulators is not terribly stable. ymmv, --Loren

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