Gear making (was Calling All Machinists)



Jay Leno said that no one in this country can make the gears that he needed for his cars.
In relation to this, I want to ask if anyone in this newsgroup, ever needed to make a gear.
I brought home two boxes of involute and other gear cutters, and cannot really fathom any possible use for them. But what I know is that if I sell them and ever need to make a gear, I will be fully fscked. But that may never happen. So, I want to know if there really is a need to make gears.
Unlike Leno, I do not have a garage full of antique cars, if that matters.
i
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On Jun 27, 3:00pm, Ignoramus16724 <ignoramus16...@NOSPAM. 16724.invalid> wrote:

Remember this? http://picasaweb.google.com/KB1DAL/HomeMadeMachines#5285710370886636434
The tractor is from the late 1980's, hardly an antique, but Sears no longer stocks a replacement steering sector gear and the tooth count is non-standard for 20 PA gears.
jsw
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wrote:

Milling a gear for an old golf-course lawnmower was my first commercial milling job. It was almost my last, too. <g>
It's of more use for making specials as replacement parts, for sizes, thicknesses, etc. that are non-standard.

If you repair antique machinery, you may be glad you have them. You'll need a good rotary indexing table to use them.

Antique steam engines? <g>
-- Ed Huntress
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No but you have an old lathe that you could break a gear on. You bring home stuff that would increase in value if a missing or broken gear was replaced.
Wes -- "Additionally as a security officer, I carry a gun to protect government officials but my life isn't worth protecting at home in their eyes." Dick Anthony Heller
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Wes wrote:

Years ago I made a gear for a fellow from the old Compuserve metal working group, Roger Peterson. He had a nice Rockwell metal lathe, with a tooth or two busted off the back gear. I felt that cutting a real working gear, was a step toward calling myself a real machinist. Offered to make the gear for free if he bought the cutter and materials. Made two just in case he ever needed another, but far as I know that lathe is still running the first gear.
I'd love to find a box or two of involute cutters, just to have around, just in case....
Jon
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I know how you feel. I tried to get work to buy me an involute cutter once along with the stock to fix a lathe. We have dividing heads and machines to use to spare. The gear was a metric one made out of an engineering plastic as a fusable part on a fairly decent sized engine lathe's screw cutting feed system.
That would have been so ez. It was on an adjustable shaft to deal with meshing with an imperial or metric ratio change gear. I could have been a bit sloppy and it would have worked.
Instead they paid too much for a custom gear.
Wes
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yes... Thanks a lot... The air has cleared and it is apparent that getting rid of this stuff would be a major mistake.
Does anyone know of some company selling this stuff that has a good PDF catalog that explains their selection. McMaster is a page with involute cutters, but it is not very detaled.
i
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On Sat, 27 Jun 2009 22:28:24 -0500, Ignoramus16724

You need the whole skippie.
see (Amazon.com product link shortened)46160782&sr=8-1
for free see http://metalworking.com/Dropbox/NAVY-repairmans-manual-Chapter14.pdf
Unka' George [George McDuffee] ------------------------------------------- He that will not apply new remedies, must expect new evils: for Time is the greatest innovator: and if Time, of course, alter things to the worse, and wisdom and counsel shall not alter them to the better, what shall be the end?
Francis Bacon (1561-1626), English philosopher, essayist, statesman. Essays, "Of Innovations" (1597-1625).
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That chapter is a keeper. Thanks a lot. I will read that and the Law book.
Now that I think about it, being able to make gears, would also enable me to make fun toys for kids.
i
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On Sat, 27 Jun 2009 22:28:24 -0500, Ignoramus16724

Machinerys Handbook Cheers,
Bruce (bruceinbangkokatgmaildotcom)
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On Sat, 27 Jun 2009 22:28:24 -0500, Ignoramus16724
<snip>

You might find these old books of interest too:
"Hobs and gear hobbing (c1914)" by John Edgar"
http://www.archive.org/details/hobsgearhobbing00edgarich
"Examples of machine shop practice (c1910)- Cutting Bevel Gears with a Rotary Cutter " by Howard Parker Fairfield"
http://www.archive.org/details/examplesofmachin00fairrich
--
Leon Fisk
Grand Rapids MI/Zone 5b
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I know a guy that makes gears and all sorts of wild stuff. He does a fair amount of stuff for the commercial marine business and large power this and that is normal. Winches and drive gears.
My wife knows his wife very well.
Martin
Ignoramus16724 wrote:

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On Jun 27, 8:00pm, Ignoramus16724 <ignoramus16...@NOSPAM. 16724.invalid> wrote:> In relation to this, I want to ask if anyone in this newsgroup, ever

Incidently for those with worm gear driven band saws, Boston Gear recommends synthetic gear oil for their worm gear reduction boxes. It used to be Mobil 634. But things change.
Dan
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Click here for a copy of the MSDS for Klbersynth UH1 6-460. Click here for a list of FAQs about the new lubricant and how to place an order for a pre-lubricated unit. Click here for a copy of the 700 Series Single Reduction Ratio & Capacity Selection Tables.
Click here for a copy of the 700 Series Single Reduction Catalog Number Explanation. Click here for a copy of the MSDS for Mobil SHC 634. Click here for a copy of the MSDS for Mobil 600.
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On Sat, 27 Jun 2009 14:00:01 -0500, Ignoramus16724

1) Mr Leno is obviously not very good at either research or machining (There are almost certainly plenty of people that could do it for the right price, and he could have done it himself if he tried. 3D printers weren't needed when his cars were made.
2) Only done spur gears so far, but have made and hardened a complete new set of gears for a Hardinge HLV apron gear box and will need to make a full set of change wheels for metric threads. Possibly I'll cast an additional gearbox to make a unique HLV-EM:-)
Mark Rand RTFM
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http://www.gleason.com/b_services_sgs.html
jsw
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On Sat, 27 Jun 2009 23:37:42 +0100, Mark Rand

On the contrary, he is very GOOD at research - and anyone who knows Jay knows they will be paid a fair price to make whatever he needs/wants. He's no cheapskate.
No standard commercial gear cutter in America could or would make the part. Very few machinists in America today have the equipment AND experience to make that gear. Some have one, some the other - but very few both.
His research paid off when he found the one old guy who had both.

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On Sat, 27 Jun 2009 21:30:29 -0400, the infamous snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca scrawled the following:

One of the links I saw showed him as a Ganesh machine customer. Maybe he bought that for the guy he found. Dunno.

But they're sure as hell handy now, huh, Mark?
-- Life is not about waiting for the storms to pass; it's about learning how to dance in the rain. --Anon
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    Yep -- replacement gears for lathes and other tools. Or missing gear, or gears to make it do something which it never had to do before.

    In addition to the involute cutters, you need a milling machine (which you have, IIRC, though a horizontal mill might be better), a dividing/indexing head (you can make do with a rotary table, but more of the angular positioning is automated with the dividing/indexing head and its wheels and arms), and the lathe to make the gear blank. This is for standard straight (spur) gears. Bevel, helical and hypoid gears take a bit more specialized machinery. But most machine tools use straight gears.
    And for production, you want a gear hobber and the proper hob for the gears which you want to make. A single hob covers all tooth counts in a given pitch and pressure angle, but it needs a much more complex and specialize machine to drive the blank and the hob.
    Another thing which is nice to have, especially if you are duplicating a damaged gear, is a gear tooth vernier caliper, but you can usually do without that if you know what the pitch and pressure angle are.

    You have old machines. You may need to make gears for them eventually.

    How many antique machine tools do you have? :-)
    FWIW, I bought the full set of involute gear cutters for the gear pitch used in my Clausing. They are expensive, and a full set is eight cutters. (Actually -- there is a secondary set -- half steps -- to do a better job for gears between the center of the range of the standard cutters.
    I would suggest that you go through your collection and sort it. First by pitch and Pressure Angle (PA), then make sure that you have at least one each of numbers 1 through 8. If you have the half step ones, keep them with the others.
    If you have duplicates, see if you can tell whether one is more dull than the other.
    *I* would keep the whole set -- among other things for the possibility of making gears needed for model steam engines or something similar.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
--
Email: < snipped-for-privacy@d-and-d.com> | Voice (all times): (703) 938-4564
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I have a mill and a right angle attachment for it. Also got the R8 arbor in the pile with the involute cutters. Plus a large quantity of slitting cutters and other horizontal mill style things. Some are used to make round grooves.
http://igor.chudov.com/tmp/Tooling.jpg
The lot includes four boxes shown.
Price was $55.

Dno, practically speaking, is it possible to make gears with a rotary table and a calculator or spreadsheet (to show angles)? Or would it not produce accurate enough geometry?
I want to make a gear, just to practice. I have a rotary table, but not a indexing head.

Yes, I have seen those.

58 year old compressor, 42 year old lathe, 35 year old mill. Note that I ewmphatically do not consider 35 year old anything to be antique.

OK... I will sort through them...
i
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Th egear cutters are in the rear right box.
Slitting and cutting saws are in the rear left and front left boxes, R8 arbor and other arbors are in the front left box. Special profile slitting cutters (round profile, vee way etc) and some more gear cutters are in the front right box.
i
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