Hacksaw frames

It is probably 20 years since I bought a new hacksaw frame.
Looking to improve my cutting precision as much as possible I have been
looking through the internet catalogues at various hacksaw frames. I cannot
make head or tail of some of the features.
Are some of the things like extra support beams and pimped-up handles
allowing up to 30,000 psi tensioning really better than the old frames?
Reply to
Michael Koblic
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I recently bought myself a Starrett hacksaw frame - it is really very nice, but I consider it a luxury, it's not a necessity
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Reply to
William Noble
Like this one?
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I need one for home since my other one is at work and I don't have a metalworking bandsaw atm. Uncle's saw is 1.4 miles away and has free coffee when I visit ;) Probably time to buy him a band for it.
Wes
Reply to
Wes
In article , "Michael Koblic" wrote:
Yes, there is nothing like a good stiff high tension hacksaw frame... they're wonderful!
Gone are the days of wandering kerfs, and uncontrolled cuts in general.
Intricate cuts are possible with a little practice, much along the lines of the 'magic' of a good file in the hands of a master.
I have two of them, my favorite is an older, essentially identical version of this one...
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The one piece die cast aluminum handle and frame end have good feel, are surprisingly light, and easy to clean. The 'spine' is steel, and will store spare blades... however, spares stored in the frame rattle and seem a bit 'Mickey Mouse' in actual use.
I also have a Craftsman frame I've delegated to the car emergency tool bag. While equally stiff, it's a little larger, heavier, and has a rubber handle grip insert that looks good, but collects crud and is difficult to clean. While only about 10 years old, this insert is already showing age with cracks and the like. I haven't seen this frame in the store in a while now.
One caution is to remember to relieve the blade tension when the frame isn't in use.
Erik
Reply to
Erik
OK I didn't know I was supposed to relive the tension when not using it. I know to lift in the cut when going back. What else should I know about using a hacksaw? Thanks Karl
Reply to
kfvorwerk
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This link discusses a hacksaw and shows a coping saw. ;-)
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This "author" says Hang Um HIGH!
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This one has four very short paragraphs under hacksaw. Be sure to notice the last two paragraphs; i.e. 3 tooth rule and new blade rule.
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Here a young kid (difficulty understanding him) actually SHOWS you how to use a cheap Stanley hacksaw which he really praises. About 9/10 of the way through the video he says, "Now don't be intimidated by this xxxxxxxx xxxx blade on a hacksaw...." I couldn't understand the x's.
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Lastly, If you are a copper thief ( ;-) ) be sure to follow this guys example. He discovered - in England - Where Else? - that power lines are made of *COPPER*
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It was a long url so I borrowed one of Tiny's.
Al
Reply to
Al Patrick
On Sun, 18 May 2008 02:30:53 -0400, with neither quill nor qualm, Wes quickly quoth:
I bought a $1.99 HF hacksaw, complete with broken-blade frame.
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short/broken blade frame is great for places you can't get a standard frame into.
Then I picked up a pack of Starrett blades for it and I couldn't be happier. A good blade outdoes a pretty ergo handle every time, IMHO. Blades MAKE a hacksaw as far as I'm concerned. Once a guy learns how to use a hacksaw properly (pressure on the cut stroke ONLY), blades last considerably longer, become easier to use, and the hacksaw becomes your friend. (Well, unless you have 25+ cuts to make in the sun and it's 104F outside...)
If Mike's investing, a portable bandsaw would be a good one.
- Press HERE to arm. (Release to detonate.) -----------
Reply to
Larry Jaques
Wes sez::
"I need one for home since my other one is at work and I don't have a metalworking bandsaw atm. Uncle's saw is 1.4 miles away and has free coffee when I visit ;) Probably time to buy him a band for it."
Getchertsef a package of Starret 32-tooth blades for that new home hack saw. Follow the 3 tooth rule and limit your hack saw work to that which is easily done with 32-teeth blades. Leave the heavy stuff for the band saw.
Bob (take it easy) Swinney
Reply to
Robert Swinney
Keywords:
I just went through this exercise. After considerable research, I ended up get the Nicholson #80965. They are about $20 at Lowes. The frame is good & solid, it's easy to get good tension on the blades, it has blade storage, and can be set up as a stab saw (haven't tried that yet). The rear grip fits my hand well and is very comfortable, and it has a rubber coated gripping horn for your forward hand that is much more comfortable than the older frames.
As for blade tension, it's hard to over tension a blade. They will last longer & cut straighter when they are really good & tight.
Doug White
Reply to
Doug White
"Erik" wrote: (clip) One caution is to remember to relieve the blade tension when the frame
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ I'd like to know the reason for that. There is a common belief that one should not leave a camera shutter or a gun cocked. As far as I can see, this would matter only if steel creeps under stress--which it generally does not.
Reply to
Leo Lichtman
Yes on the newer high tension frames! I cut about any thing with my hacksaw. I don't even own a bandsaw. I had a friend bring over some 2" x 1/4 wall square tubing one day that he needed cut. He figured I had a bandsaw. I said no problem, clamped it in the vise and made the 3-4 cut offs he wanted. He could not believe I was going to use good old man power to do it. After years of practice I bet I can cut off a chunk of tubing straighter than most bandsaws! Greg
Reply to
Greg O
Yes, that is the one, saw it at the Starrett booth at Westech, and then ordered it a few months after - I really like it, but I can't say that it is inherently better than something less expensive. The one down side is that it will only work with 12 inch blades, no 10 inch capability like some of the cheaper ones
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Reply to
William Noble
Follow the 3 tooth
blades. Leave the
most things that are in the range of a 32-tooth blade can be cut far more easily with tin snips or a shear :-)
Mark Rand (18 tpi and 14tpi in my frames) RTFM
Reply to
Mark Rand
"William Noble" wrote {clip)The one down side is that
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ That may be, Bill, but do you ever use 10" blades? I don't even own any.
Reply to
Leo Lichtman
I haven't used a 10" blade in years. 12" seems like a normal stroke for my arm. I'm 6 foot+.
I'll have to wait until next payday to order one though. Got a little crazy last night ordering things. Those Mitutoyo IP65 mics are great.
Wes
Reply to
Wes
Hacksaws are a lot like files in that way.
I see McMaster has bimetal and positive rake bimetal. Each takes a strong frame. I wonder which is better? I gave away my last blade at work to a coworker. Time to order replacements.
104F Hell never hit 46F today. I was out in the garage shivering next to a electric radiant heater putting a HF cutter grinder together. That is going to take a bit of rework.
I have yet to sweat this year.
Wes -- "Additionally as a security officer, I carry a gun to protect government officials but my life isn't worth protecting at home in their eyes." Dick Anthony Heller
Reply to
Wes
Leo, I had the same thoughts. I de-tension my ww bandsaw to protect the tires. A hacksaw frame, if it can't stand the tension, it is junk, same for the blade.
Wes
Reply to
Wes
well, I have about 6 boxes of 10 inch blades - some good brand too - maybe even Starrett
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Reply to
William Noble
That's the best hacksaw I've found as well. Note the bulge in the hand grip. I also own one of the Starretts mentioned elsewhere in this thread. The handle on the Starrett is flat-sided and too thin for comfort.
Lenox bi-metal blades are also far better than Starrett blades, though they are relatively expensive.
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Reply to
Ned Simmons
My hacksaw is adjustable for 4 different lengths.
What is the quality of the 10 inch ? and how much ?
I run 3 different hacksaws at the moment - different blades and one a carbide. I even have a one hand / handle hacksaw.
Martin
Martin H. Eastburn @ home at Lions' Lair with our computer lionslair at consolidated dot net TSRA, Endowed; NRA LOH & Patron Member, Golden Eagle, Patriot's Medal. NRA Second Amendment Task Force Charter Founder IHMSA and NRA Metallic Silhouette maker & member.
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William Noble wrote:
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Reply to
Martin H. Eastburn

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