hardfacing with TIG-followup

So a while back I had asked the group if it was possible to use stripped SMAW(stick) hardfacing electrodes with TIG.
I finally got a chance to try it.
I had some Lincoln wearshield ABR left from another project.
I stripped the coating off the rod. Very messy, kind of greasy the way the coating gets in your skin. Hard to wash off. Took a long time before the bare rod wouldn't leave black marks on a rag.
It went OK, but the 1/8" rod was a bit big for the size of stock I was working with. The puddle kept foaming up and hitting the tungsten. I managed to do better by putting more heat on the rod, and letting the deposit sit on top of the base metal.
After laying a few beads, I gave it the file test. It was harder than 1018, but not as hard as beads that I had put down before with SMAW.
I quick re-heat and quench and it passed the file test with flying colors. I think that I couldn't go fast enough, so the whole piece got too hot to cool the bead fast enough after I stopped.
The data sheet for the rods mentioned not letting the workpiece get too hot.
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Dan H.
northshore MA.
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A number of hardfacing alloys rely on substantial pickup from the flux. With a chrome iron electrode it should have enough alloy to be hardenable by water quenching, but will not be the same as the original. I normally use higher alloy consumables than this, they have recovery rates of about 140%.

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What's that Lassie? You say that ddeu fell down the old rec.crafts.metalworking mine and will die if we don't mount a rescue by Sun, 17 Jan 2010 22:39:03 -0000:

Recovery rate?
The coating on the rod was thinner than most, but I suspect you are correct that the flux adds to the alloy of the bead.
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Dan H.
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What's that Lassie? You say that Pinstripe Sniper fell down the old rec.crafts.metalworking mine and will die if we don't mount a rescue by Sun, 17 Jan 2010 19:08:17 GMT:

I'm not sure if it was a separate layer of goo, or just what stuck to the wire. It was kinda like graphite(carbon?) in the way that it gets all over everything.

If I had a bigger torch, or smaller rods, I would try it with the coating on, just to see what happens.

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Dan H.
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If the goo was carbon, it certainly would up the carbon content of the weld which would make sense. That along with a fast freeze would bump the hardness up a lot.
dan wrote:

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