Heat Transfer in Ice Cream Scoop?

We've had a cast aluminum ice cream scoop in our kitchen tool collection for over thirty years. (Metal content.) It has no moving parts, and is
sort of trowel shaped with a flat front edge.
It's marked "Roll Dipper Co., Maumee, OH", but I can't Google up anything for that name.
It has a hollow handle with an aluminum plug crimped into the end.
What's puzzling me is that when I shake it it feels like there is liquid inside the handle.
Did/do they ever make ice cream scoops with a heat transfer medium inside the handle to move the heat from your hand down to the blade, or is what I'm feeling maybe just water which gets in past a leak at the end plug when the scoop is run through the dishwasher?
Somewhere in the crevices of my mind I think I remember reading something about sodium metal being used for things like that.
Thanks guys,
Jeff
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Jeff Wisnia (W1BSV + Brass Rat '57 EE)

"My luck is so bad that if I bought a cemetery, people would stop dying."
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You're right, the liquid is there to take heat from your hand and warm up the scoop so it cuts the ice cream better. We have too of them, I think both made by Zeroll. They're pretty cool, and they work, or at least they seem too. I rarely use anything else so I guess I wouldn't really know. -Will
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Will writes:

Right about the hand heat, but not why. The antifreeze is there to keep the ice cream from sticking to the scoop by keeping the scoop surface above freezing. Cutting isn't appreciably affected, because next to no melting occurs in the bulk of the product.
It always annoys me when I see people park this type of scoop in the ice cream bucket. Completely defeats the design.
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ooops, this was supposed to go to the group, not your email. Sorry Richard... --------------- Yeah, I think you're right about sticking being the purpose. But I think it would still help cut better. If the scoop is above freezing temp, you're going to have a (very thin) layer of melted ice cream between the scoop and the ice cream, so it would cut through the ice cream a little better by not sticking as it goes. But I'm really just guessing at all of this. . . -Will
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Would it help to think of it as a TiN coating for the toolbit? :o) Or lead in brass or graphite in cast iron since it's self-lubricating...
Tim
-- "I have misplaced my pants." - Homer Simpson | Electronics, - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - --+ Metalcasting and Games: http://webpages.charter.net/dawill/tmoranwms
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On Thu, 22 Apr 2004 11:49:47 -0500, Richard J Kinch
......and in reply I say!: remove ns from my header address to reply via email

How do you reason that anti-freeze in a handle is going to keep the scoop surface above freezing, unles by transfer from hand warmth?
Wouldn't you need to put the anti-freeze in the icecream to stop _it_ freezing, without outside heat?
Why do you think that heating the scoop would not aid cutting? Think ice skates. What other purpose would there be to warm to sccop? **************************************************** I went on a guided tour not long ago.The guide got us lost. He was a non-compass mentor.........sorry ........no I'm not.
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Old Nick writes:

Isn't that what I said?

Eh?

There is no heat transfer or net phase change going on with ice skates and the comparison is pointless.
You "cut" ice cream by plastic deformation (like metal! metal content here!), not by melting. There is far too much frozen mass involved with far too little contact area for far too little time with a far too small reservoir of heat in the scoop for the ice cream to be melted more than incidentally.
I have a actively heated nickel-chromium (more metal!) grid ice cutter in my ice machine <http://www.truetex.com/icemachine.htm which takes about 20 minutes to cut all of 1/2" into an ice slab by *melting*. Cutting a frozen product by melting requires a large heat input, far more than an antifreeze-style ice cream scoop could provide. This is perhaps not intuitive or apparent without appreciating the thermodynamics and the latent heat of phase changes.

As I've said, to keep the scooped ball from sticking to the scoop, by melting a very thin layer in contact with the scoop surface. Typically even this wet layer re-freezes after the ball leaves the scoop, since ice cream is typically served in a slightly subcooled state (which is why you can get chunks of ice if the scoop is kept in warm water that drips into the product, thus the sponge accompanying the water bath at the ice cream parlor).
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    [ ... ]

    Actually -- there is. The compression (body weight on edges) causes a phase change from solid to liquid inside the groove in the ice skate, thus lubricating its travel across the ice. When the skate has passed by, the water re-freezes quickly.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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In fact, I've heard you can hang a nice weight from a thin wire looped around a thick block of ice supported on the ends, and it will slowly slide through. But because the water freezes in the groove after the wire passes, the block won't be cut in two, instead it will always be supported...interesting!
Tim
-- "I have misplaced my pants." - Homer Simpson | Electronics, - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - --+ Metalcasting and Games: http://webpages.charter.net/dawill/tmoranwms
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On Sun, 25 Apr 2004 15:50:12 -0500, "Tim Williams"

The same thing can happen when using a bandsaw with too fine a tooth to cut a block of nylon.
Ask me how I know...sigh
Gunner
No 220-pound thug can threaten the well-being or dignity of a 110-pound woman who has two pounds of iron to even things out. Is that evil? Is that wrong? People who object to weapons aren't abolishing violence, they're begging for the rule of brute force, when the biggest, strongest animals among men were always automatically "right". Guns end that, and social democracy is a hollow farce without an armed populace to make it work.         - L. Neil Smith
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Heh, ouch. Same with steel and real high speed, although, then the metal stays out of the joint afterwards so nevermind...
Tim
-- "I have misplaced my pants." - Homer Simpson | Electronics, - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - --+ Metalcasting and Games: http://webpages.charter.net/dawill/tmoranwms
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On Mon, 26 Apr 2004 12:33:34 -0500, "Tim Williams"

That happened with my very first bandsaw..one of those little Harbor Frieght table top jobbies. I got my Walker Turner shortly after that..and that poor little critter still had that chunk of nylon surrounding the blade 4 yrs later when I gave it to a buddy. No blade welder, no silver solder..he cut the blade and bought a new one.
One of lifes little embaressing moments....sigh
Gunner
No 220-pound thug can threaten the well-being or dignity of a 110-pound woman who has two pounds of iron to even things out. Is that evil? Is that wrong? People who object to weapons aren't abolishing violence, they're begging for the rule of brute force, when the biggest, strongest animals among men were always automatically "right". Guns end that, and social democracy is a hollow farce without an armed populace to make it work.         - L. Neil Smith
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snipped-for-privacy@lightspeed.net says...

Yeah, but probably not as embarrasing as being blown out of the water by Ed Huntress for the last few month's, eh?
Jim Kovar Vulcan, Mi
(By the way, I've had two inquiries in the last two weeks, and yes, this is my real name and residence. What's wrong with posting real names here? I guess some people like to hide behind an alias. Now *that* is gutless.)
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On Mon, 26 Apr 2004 17:02:58 -0500, Jim Kovar

Nope..some times I put Ed in the barrel, and some times its my turn. Shrug.
The last time I was embaressed..was when I was caught in de lecto (actually de Rambler <G>) with the lady on top having a marvelously and totally unihibited and screaming good time, caught by the local sherrif.
Who happened to be her father.
We were both over the legal age by a couple years. Shrug..I felt embaressed for him, as he had watched this nubile and well filled out young lady doing the mindless watusi though heavily fogged windows. I recall well the look on his face with she rolled down the window and said Hi Daddy!
Poor bastard. Sigh. Later when I caught my son doing the same..I knew how he felt, sorta kinda. Daughters of course are different...shrug.
If I was worried about being embaressed, Id never post.
Gunner
No 220-pound thug can threaten the well-being or dignity of a 110-pound woman who has two pounds of iron to even things out. Is that evil? Is that wrong? People who object to weapons aren't abolishing violence, they're begging for the rule of brute force, when the biggest, strongest animals among men were always automatically "right". Guns end that, and social democracy is a hollow farce without an armed populace to make it work.         - L. Neil Smith
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Ah, it's nothing that years of therapy can't fix.
Every generation thinks they invented it. Suprise.
Jim
================================================= please reply to: JRR(zero) at yktvmv (dot) vnet (dot) ibm (dot) com ================================================
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A city wide blackout at Tue, 27 Apr 2004 01:45:03 GMT did not prevent Gunner

    LOL - far better than being interrupted by the cops while necking with my SO. He no doubt thought he'd caught a couple of under grads from the University, and was a tad embarrassed to discover he'd caught a grad student and an "OTA" student who were older than he. Everything was very serious, but we got the giggles after he left.
--
pyotr filipivich.
as an explaination for the decline in the US's tech edge, James
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says...

Worse is getting a ticket for 'loitering a closed area' when necking with your bride. From a female cop who looked to be about 19 years old. That was the *one* night out when grandparents were watching the baby....
The cop never did show up at the courthouse for the trial though. Dismissed.
Jim
================================================= please reply to: JRR(zero) at yktvmv (dot) vnet (dot) ibm (dot) com ================================================
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wrote:

Or watching submarine races with firstborn sleeping in the carriage body in the back seat and the wheels firmly strapped to the roof rack of the VW beetle. That car did have a reclining seat on the passenger side which did prove conveient at times. Gerry :-)} London, Canada
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Tim Williams wrote:

<snipped>
Yes, and being born in California and living there until college time, I hadn't experienced freezing weather and all it's pleasures and pains until I came to Taxachusetts, where I stupidly still remain some 50 years later.
It took a slip and fall accident (with an ensuing busted wrist and pelvis) getting out of my car in my own driveway a couple of years ago to make me finaly realize that when stepping onto any icy pavement from a warm building or vehicle that it's wise to pause and wait about twenty seconds for your shoe soles to get cold so they're less likely to melt a slippery layer of water to ruin your day.
I've also noticed that when temperatures get to around minus 10 degrees Farenheit, tire traction on icy surfaces improves greatly, it almost feels like you're driving on bare pavement.
Jeff (Who left his heart in San Francisco...)
--
Jeff Wisnia (W1BSV + Brass Rat '57 EE)

"My luck is so bad that if I bought a cemetery, people would stop dying."
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Jeff Wisnia wrote:

Without this effect a large portion of Canada would grind to a halt for several months a year. As a kid, playing hockey on the street (this in the days before the widespread use of salt and sand) we would pause our game and move the nets for the odd car or truck that needed 'our' road. Those vehicles had no traction problems (-20) to negotiate the 'rink'. On another note - I scored a pound of sodium metal - long story, perfectly legal - many years ago - and discovered that a piece (maybe a 3/8 inch cube) - when dropped on an ice covered road would burrow its way through the six or so inches of compact ice on said road until it got to the pavement/gravel. Then this little piece of reactive metal would melt a little cavern and sooner or later accumulate enough hot water to 'go critical'. Spectacular is the only way to describe the resulting explosion. Good way to amaze your friends and terrify your enemies. Also a good way to bring in the New Year - Blow up a really large stretch of the local road. Never got caught. Regards. Ken.
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