Help optimizing CNC lathe part

Esteemed RCM'ers: I'm designing a part that'll be produced on a CNC lathe and am looking for "design for manufacturing" help from anyone who has more knowledge of CNC lathes than I (that's about everyone, since I have never worked with a CNC lathe).
Here's the design as it stands:
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I'm thinking:
1) pick up knurling tool, knurl
2) RH tool, shape crown, then bevel for next knurl
3) LH tool, finish head enough to cut face groove
4) some tool, cut face groove
5) LH tool, finish profile of part
6) thread tool, thread
7) parting tool, part off
That seems like a lot of tool changes.
- Any ideas on simplifying this? design tweaks to make it easier?
- Are the 0.010" fillets I have drawn reasonable (not too small)?
- suggestions for SS material to specify that will be easy to machine and have a nice finish?
TIA for any thoughts, dean
This is the pivot for an improved lid shutter on my (Joeveo) coffee mugs. Bosses are to be staked to retain the wave spring washer and the shutter. I'll be looking for a shop to make these too--get in touch if you'd like to quote.
Reply to
Dean Verhoeven
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This is the pivot for an improved lid shutter on my (Joeveo) coffee mugs. Bosses are to be staked to retain the wave spring washer and the shutter. I'll be looking for a shop to make these too--get in touch if you'd like to quote.
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Is the heat-regulating material potassium carbonate?
Reply to
Jim Wilkins
It's a wax with melting point around 140°F.
Reply to
Dean Verhoeven
> Esteemed RCM'ers: I'm designing a part that'll be produced on a CNC lathe and am looking for "design for manufacturing" help from anyone who has more knowledge of CNC lathes than I (that's about everyone, since I have never worked with a CNC lathe). > > Here's the design as it stands: >
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> I'm thinking: > > 1) pick up knurling tool, knurl > 2) RH tool, shape crown, then bevel for next knurl > 3) LH tool, finish head enough to cut face groove > 4) some tool, cut face groove > 5) LH tool, finish profile of part > 6) thread tool, thread > 7) parting tool, part off > > That seems like a lot of tool changes. > > - Any ideas on simplifying this? design tweaks to make it easier? > - Are the 0.010" fillets I have drawn reasonable (not too small)? > - suggestions for SS material to specify that will be easy to machine and have a nice finish? > > TIA for any thoughts, dean > > This is the pivot for an improved lid shutter on my (Joeveo) coffee mugs. Bosses are to be staked to retain the wave spring washer and the shutter. I'll be looking for a shop to make these too--get in touch if you'd like to quote.
Reply to
Cydrome Leader
Why is a bolt for a coffee cup so complex? Why does a coffee cup even need all this nonsense?
All that's missing are english threads, or something adorable like M7x0.8, exotic alloys, ceramic bearings or seals or vent channels, like for high vacuum equipment. Don't forget to leave room for the thermocouple.
Reply to
Cydrome Leader
Our customers, many of them anyway, would like to be able to put their mug in a backpack or purse without fear of coffee leaks. I'd like to accommodate them with a leak-proof, easy-to-open/close/clean lid.
Reply to
Dean Verhoeven
How do you clean the crevices for staked on springs on a lid with through holes to what looks like the wet side?
Maybe I'll invent something called a "thermos" with vacuum insulation and a leak proof lid, one that even doubles as a cup.
Reply to
Cydrome Leader
Avex / Coleman / Contigo / China.....
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Reply to
Jim Wilkins
If the clearances are right, you'll be able to put the shutter in the silverware basket of your dishwasher and it will get thoroughly cleaned.
There are lots of vacuum-insulated travel mugs on the market (as Jim notes), but they all aim to keep your coffee as hot as possible. Mine keeps your coffee at a comfortable drinking temperature. You can drink it right away without burning your mouth, and it stays hot for hours.
Reply to
Dean Verhoeven
If the clearances are right, you'll be able to put the shutter in the silverware basket of your dishwasher and it will get thoroughly cleaned.
There are lots of vacuum-insulated travel mugs on the market (as Jim notes), but they all aim to keep your coffee as hot as possible. Mine keeps your coffee at a comfortable drinking temperature. You can drink it right away without burning your mouth, and it stays hot for hours.
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As a hands-on experimenter and prototyper I'd like to see a time vs temperature graph, if you have one. If not I can tell you how to log temperature, voltage and current data for $35 per optically isolated channel.
Reply to
Jim Wilkins
The graph is on joeveo.com on the "Temperfect Tech" page
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. Measured with a USB-TC interface from Measurement Computing and a program I wrote under Linux to get the numbers from it. No optical isolation though.
Reply to
Dean Verhoeven
Don't bet your life on that! >There are lots of vacuum-insulated travel mugs on the market (as Jim notes), but they all aim to keep your coffee as hot as possible. Mine keeps your coffee at a comfortable drinking temperature. You can drink it right away without burning your mouth, and it stays hot for hours.
Reply to
Gerry
The graph is on joeveo.com on the "Temperfect Tech" page
formatting link
. Measured with a USB-TC interface from Measurement Computing and a program I wrote under Linux to get the numbers from it. No optical isolation though.
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Thanks, that's nice.
I was asked to build a version of Andrea Rossi's E-Cat energy source and quickly noticed questionable experimental procedure and dubious explanations, so I limited my participation to advice. For your project I'm not going to do a free patent search for lid seal mechanisms. I've already dodged one patent lawsuit.
Reply to
Jim Wilkins
Yeah, nothing like 900 parts to toss in a dishwasher.
Any how does some rediculous rube-goldberg lid help with that? It sounds like there's some phase change material for temp control, which sounds stellar until you look at the absurd container, a problem that was solved long ago.
If you need complexity to seem sophisticated, buy some Zojirushi coffee thermoses with the pushbutton spout, drill a hole in the body and replace the vacuum with your wax.
Reply to
Cydrome Leader

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