Hex head vs hex socket head

Assuming no counterbore and space is not a problem, how do you
choose between hex head and hex socket head ?
I've noticed that hex head screws are commonly available up to
property class 8.8 while hex socket head screws go up to 12.9.
Why is that ?
Reply to
Andre Majorel
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Socket head screws are higher tech, and look more impressive. All the racers will think better of you if you use socket head screws _everywhere_.
But you'll have to get some wrenches, 'cause vice-grips don't work as well on socket-head screws.
Reply to
Tim Wescott
What Tim said. And SHCS's require far less tool clearance. BTW, If you want to get the full specified strength from a SHCS boltup, be sure to do the little chamfer where the through hole opens up into the counter- bore. Details in Machinery's Handbook.
Reply to
Jim Stewart
space is not a problem, how do you
Absofrigginlutely. Back in the days when I was turning wrenches for a living at a motorcycle shop in the Bronx (1974), the two most popular jobs we did were drilling holes in exhast baffles to make Jap bikes sound "better," and replacing all the phillips head screws with socket- head screws. Both were totally cosmetic, but hey, if the jerks ^H^H^H^H^H customers were willing to pay...
Reply to
rangerssuck
(...)
I have yet to 'cam out' my first hex socket head cap screw. Phillips are a different story however.
:)
--Winston
Reply to
Winston
And a set of wrenches that fits from #0 thru 1/2" screws costs less than $20 and fits in your back pocket.
Reply to
Ned Simmons
Slightly off-topic...
There's lots of hardcore biking where I live and the $100 seats are theft targets. The bicycle shops have been supergluing a bearing ball in the head of the SHCS that tightens the seat clamp to discourage casual theft. Hitting the SHCS with a torch for a few seconds causes the ball to drop out.
Reply to
Jim Stewart
> (...) > >> and replacing all the phillips head screws with socket- >> head screws. Both were totally cosmetic, but hey, if the jerks >> ^H^H^H^H^H customers were willing to pay... > > I have yet to 'cam out' my first hex socket head > cap screw. Phillips are a different story however. > > :) > > --Winston
Reply to
David Billington
I used to drag race years ago. The sanctioning body banned the used of socket head capscrews in shear applications, supposedly the higher grade bolts were more brittle and failed in shear.
Reply to
Dennis
Several years back, I purchased some "guaranteed for life" screwdrivers. I asked if the guarantee applied to the Philips drivers since I would never use them to drive, only to remove Philips head fasteners. Gerry :-)} London, Canada
Reply to
Gerald Miller
> > (...) > > > and replacing all the phillips head screws with socket- > > head screws. Both were totally cosmetic, but hey, if the jerks > > ^H^H^H^H^H customers were willing to pay... > > I have yet to 'cam out' my first hex socket head > cap screw. =A0Phillips are a different story however. > > :) > > --Winston
Reply to
rangerssuck
(...)
Perhaps the Dutch had a colony in Portland at one time?
:)
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--Winston
Reply to
Winston
There are washers available that provide the same radius clearance too.
John
Reply to
John
>> rangerssuck wrote: >> (...) >> >>> and replacing all the phillips head screws with socket- >>> head screws. Both were totally cosmetic, but hey, if the jerks >>> ^H^H^H^H^H customers were willing to pay... >> >> I have yet to 'cam out' my first hex socket head >> cap screw. Phillips are a different story however. >> >> :) >> >> --Winston
Reply to
John
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A common problem -- because the right size Phillips driver *looks* too big. If you can't train people to feel for minimum slack in the fit of the bit to the screw slot, you will have a lot of munged heads and bits.
Enjoy, DoN.
Reply to
DoN. Nichols
I despise Phillips head screws. Try taking out the one on a Salt Belt car's headlight rim...^%(*%^%^^(^
I prefer Torx; one of the very few good inventions of Generous Motors.
Reply to
David Lesher
Hmmm... I don't think Torx drive fasteners were GM's baby. They just use them a lot. Check this:
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For the record, I really like this drive system as well. I don't ever recall having a Torx issue, other than the occasional need to clean spooge and/or paint from screw heads.
Erik
Reply to
Erik
You must live where salt on the roads isn't a Big Deal. I've lost track of how many hex socket and Torx heads have rusted out to a sort- of-round hole. Philips just rust out to a dimple. One reason for the existance of needle-nose visegrips. Cars and trucks more than a few years old look like metal mice have been nibbling on them.
Stan
Reply to
stans4
Try a paste of Comet Cleaner and water applied to the grooves before putting the driver in. And use new high-quality drivers.
Reply to
Jim Stewart

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