How to move a Bridgeport

This has been asked here before, but it's been awhile.
Series II machine. Not sure of table length.
I'd be alone.
Not on palette in photo.
How much does a Series II machine weigh?
Would a lift truck handle the weight?
Is there a better option than a lift truck?
What do I need to rent to pick it up and get it on the truck?
The opening in my shop door is 35" wide.
Obviously I've got to take off the table. How do you do that?
How heavy is the table?
What am I missing?
What should a bare Series II machine with a broken table drive, but all else, including DRO working sell for? I don't know backlash on feed screws or looseness of table at this point. Can't get away to see it this weekend, but if it's still around, maybe the next weekend.
TIA - RWL
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The easiest is to get a flatbed trailer and a forklift. Bridgeport manual explains how to lift it safely.
i
On 2008-09-19, GeoLane at PTD dot NET <GeoLane> wrote:

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GeoLane at PTD dot NET wrote:

I'm not sure what the series 2 is but my belt change BP went through a 2' 6" doorway with the 42" x 9" table in place. I just wound the table all the way to one end, then angled the BP so the table could be wound all the way to the other end through the doorway, then pushed the BP through. The base being about 24" wide it was no problem. The BP was being moved on flat concrete on 1" diameter steel bars and a pry bar.
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David Billington wrote:

The Series-II Bridgeport is a totally different machine, and MUCH larger than the traditional (Series-I) machines everybody thinks of first. It is about 7 feet tall, weighs 3500 Lbs or so in the manual version and much more as a CNC. The manual machine has 15" of Y travel, the Series-I only 12". Everything is scaled up bigger. The knee ways are box ways instead of dovetail.
Jon
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Jon Elson wrote:

Jon,
Thanks, I was shortly going to look up the series 2 to see what it was but you comment brings back some memories suggesting it is a much larger machine.
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We have one like that but it is labeled a Series II Special. What makes it special other than being a bigger BP?
Wes
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Wes wrote:

The special doesn't refer to size, but something else. Did it have the T ram? That allows you to mount multiple heads on the T, side by side. Often used with a tracer control, but it can also be used manually to make 2 or 3 parts at once. It may also just have a special head, with different speed ranges or whatever.
Jon
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Just looks like a big bridgeport. 12inch x ? table. Box ways, 2HP varidrive, R8 spindle.
Wes
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GeoLane at PTD dot NET wrote:

OK, I gather this is a Series-II manual machine, that should weigh around 3500 Lbs.
A 35" door sounds like a problem. I've moved a Series-I through a narrow door, the trick is to angle one end of the table through, crank the table to the other end and swing the rest of the machine through. I can't say for sure, but I suspect the Series-II will NOT make it through a 35" door without removing the table. Taking the table off a Series-I is fairly easy. I guess since this isn't a BOSS (CNC) machine, it should be about the same. Remove right side handle and power feed box. The feed should slide off the end, use left handle to crank the table until it runs out of screw threads. Remove screw and the bearing bracket. Use an engine hoist and lifting straps to support the table, and slide the rest of the way off. The gib may fall out, make sure to secure it before you move anything else. If you don't have an engine hoist, use a STURDY table, and crank the knee to match the height of the table. I'd guess a Series-II table is about 500 Lbs. Also, the Series-II is very tall, at least 7 feet (CNC is even taller).
I think only the VERY biggest lift-gate trucks could handle a Bridgeport Series-II. Also, check the doorway height, the machine might not fit through!
Value is so dependent on condition and features, I can't begin to comment. The specific spindle taper and head also makes a difference.
Jon
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wrote:

Thanks for all of the comments. I didn't realize the Series II was substantially bigger. I have not seen the machine other than in photos, but it sounds like it's not worth the trip to actually see it (abt 2 hours). Guess I'll wait till there's a Series I within reasonable driving distance.
I'm starting to watch the eBay sales to get a better feel for price. Wish I'd lived closer to Bridgeport, CT. A well tooled Series I that looked to be in unusally good condition went for $2200 yesterday.
Thanks for the comments. If there are any more suggestions though, keep them coming.
RWL
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On Fri, 19 Sep 2008 23:43:57 -0400, GeoLane at PTD dot NET <GeoLane at PTD dot NET> wrote:

Look around for a Lagun. A superior machine to the Bridgeport, in my opinion.
Id rather have a Lagun that a Bridgeport, conditon being equal
Gunner, machine tool mechanic
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GeoLane at PTD dot NET wrote:

If you can handle moving it and housing it, the Series-II is a better machine for about 5 reasons. I can't handle the height in my basement, so I'm just out of luck. They also often go cheaper as most home shops don't have the room, height or whatever for them.
Jon
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On Sun, 21 Sep 2008 22:52:02 -0500,

Technically I have about 1" of height to spare - the machine is 92 " high and I have 94", BUT it would be difficult to tilt the head right or left without hitting the ceiling joists. If it was located between the joists, I could probably nod the head without difficulty.
Probably wouldn't fit through my 35" wide cellar door without dissassembly, and
Spindle is Erickson #40. I don't recall seeing Erickson #40 stuff for sale in the catalogs like I see sales on R8 tooling. I see CAT 40 tooling for sale on eBay, but I don't know if that's the same as Erickson #40.
RWL
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On 2008-09-23, GeoLane at PTD dot NET <GeoLane> wrote:
    [ ... ]

    O.K.
    And the problem then becomes where to get the room to *re*assemble it indoors. :-) In particular, the, getting the motor back into the head. (The CNC version of the Series-I has the motor (a pancake three-phase one) *under* the casting, so there is a little more room, but it is still a real pain to install.

    Look for NTMB 40 (or is it NMTB?) That is the same as the Erickson. These have a flat flange with a pair of notches to engage keys on the spindle (and to be clamped by the Erickson quick-change spindle). The CAT-40 (or any of the CAT series) are designed for automatic tool changers. The flange is thicker and has a V-groove in it to be gripped by the changer. The two grooves through the flange are different width, to allow the tool to always go back in the same relationship to the spindle -- even with a machine handling it. In place of a socket for a possible drawbar (not needed with the Erickson quick-change spindle) there is a ball screwed into the back which is gripped by a special collet to pull the holder into the spindle.
    I have turned a CAT 30 taper flange down to work in an Erickson quick-change spindle on a Series-I Bridgeport, but I haven't put much use on it yet.
    For *my* use of 40-taper tooling, they *all* work. The actual taper part is the same for all (with one cam-locking version having a scoop out one side which is not enough to keep it from working in the my spindle. This is in the Nichols horizontal mill with a drawbar. For the CAT 40 ones I apply heat with a propane torch to release the Loctite and unscrew the ball stud, then I turn up an extension to screw into it and to accept the drawbar just as the NTMB-40 does. This lets me pick and choose from eBay to fill out strange sizes at need. I also have a step-down from 40-taper to 30-taper to let me use holders for the Bridgeport in the Nichols. (No way to go the other direction, however. :-)
    But for the Erickson -- the NTMB flange is the right thickness, and it all works (based on my 30-taper experience). That thickness is critical for the lock collar to work properly.
    Good Luck,         DoN.
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On 2008-09-19, GeoLane at PTD dot NET <GeoLane> wrote:

    That depends on various things -- such as whether it is a CNC machine or not.
    Just as a staring point, a Series I (not your Series II) with the BOSS-3 CNC configuration weighs in at about 3500 pounds. Not exactly a feather. :-) But the machine's own weight is augmented by the big stepper motors, the ball-screws, and the massive collection of transformers (and mag amps) in the housing on the back. I would just guess (with *no* firm knowledge) that a manual Series II might be about the same weight as a CNC Series I.

    My Series I was delivered on a flatbed truck, and needed a rental fork lift to get it off the truck and up to my garage.

    A flatbed truck -- and a fork lift at each end.
    Or perhaps a tilt-bed wrecker.

    It needs to be on a good strong pallet.
    if the truck is anything other than a tilt-bed wrecker, I think that a fork lift is the only way to go.

    Maybe not. I have read reports of people working a mill through a narrow door by running the table all the way to one side, sticking the base and the near end of the table through at a bit of an angle, cranking the table all the way to the other side (so the bulk of the table is now inside) and moving the mill the rest of the way through the door. Not sure whether this will be possible with your size of door and a Series II (I know that they are bigger than my Series I, but I don't know how much bigger), but if the base will go through the door with a few extra inches to spare to allow coming in at an angle, you might be able to make it with the table in place.

    You don't want to know! :-) To remove it, I think that it would need a hydraulic table on each side to support it and jack it up the vertical ways while you remove the tapered gibs and get it totally clear. I think that a fork lift would be the better choice there too -- except that if you are having trouble getting the mill through the door, the same applies to the fork lift. Hmm ... perhaps a pallet jack?

    A bigger door.

    Sorry -- I don't know. It has been too many years since I bought mine, and it was a Series I, with a very obsolete CNC setup.

    Good Luck,         DoN.
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I brought my series I home on a light utility trailer. Head, ram, turret base inside capper on top of a F150 truck.
http://wess.freeshell.org/usenet/rec.crafts.metalworking/DSC02979_vga.jpg
About 1500# as pictured.
The head, ram, and turret go at leawst 450#
Wes
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This my experience with the smaller Bridgeport:
http://www.truetex.com/movebpt.htm
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