How to remove concrete residue from plastic

I have a couple of those
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They have white concrete on them, some solidly stuck. How can I remove
it safely to restore the good looks. Thanks
Reply to
Ignoramus20184
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Ugh. If you're brave, muriatic acid should do it.
Reply to
Ed Huntress
(concrete saw)
The most "safe" and expensive way is to use a liquid product called "Concrete Blaster":
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Designed specifically to remove cured concrete from construction equipment.
Might be a bit tricky to use on your saws.
I'd soak a towel in the stuff and then wrap the towel around the saws.
That stuff is moderately expensive.
If you're more adventurous, I'd use muriatic acid (Home Despot sells it by the gallon last time I checked). Cut it 50-50 (or more) with water - and then use the towel method.
But keep it away from any shiny metal, because the acid will take the finish off.
It's best if you can remove all the plastic parts and dunk them by themselves into the acid.
Any non-shiny metal parts that have dried concrete on them can be dunked in acid - just don't let them sit in the acid for a long time (more than 10 minutes).
If you use muriatic acid, wear a good filter-mask (with cartriges) because the fumes will sting your nose.
Reply to
Home Guy
My first approach would be diluting some phosphoric acid (etchant for automotive primer, metal-prep). Mix in a Labeled trigger spray bottle, and wet the residue, checking adhesion and re-wetting as needed.
I believe the muriatic would work, but it's a much nastier product to have around machines.
Some of those tile cleaners like lime-away (can't recall the one with 3 letters), which contain phosphoric acid may be effective, too.
When the residue begins to release, a stiff bristle brush would likely remove most of it without stripping off the epoxy? case paint.
Reply to
Wild_Bill
Sell it to me with the nasty stuff still on it... Seriously, was in my local HD today getting prices on rentals etc of one of those.
Reply to
William Bagwell
Can you get the plastic covers off? If so, just leave them in a bucket of water with a little vinegar in it. I guess a LITTLE muriatic acid would do the same. Soaking in even mild acid over time turns concrete into mush.
Jon
Reply to
Jon Elson
Ignoramus20184 wrote in news:1eOdnVATErJRZn7TnZ2dnUVZ snipped-for-privacy@giganews.com:
Looks like a thin layer on the covers. Perhaps a few times in and out of a freezer will let the plastic and concrete expand at different rates, getting it to loosen. A few sharp taps on a concrete floor and you're done ... Maybe ...
Reply to
Han
A wire brush, of course!
Reply to
Tom Gardner
Others have suggested acid, but thats probably not concrete that set in place. Thats a concrete wet saw, so the white stuff is just dust from old concrete that dried on. I bet warm soapy water and a nylon brush will take that right off. A little vinegar couldn't hurt.
Reply to
anorton
its a commercially used tool, it needs to look decent, but doesnt need to look brand new.......
if your reselling it you might price new covers
Reply to
bob haller
Why don't you read what others have posted here on the subject before you put your foot in your mouth?
Reply to
Home Guy
That looks like a TS400, they are very popular amongst contractors, and easy to repair and get parts for. I would try washing it with hot soapy water first because it could be the splash from wet cutting. If not, it wouldn't be difficult to remove the covers and soak them in acid. Those saws average around $400.00 on ebay in good condition.
Reply to
rustyjames
Because it wasn't relavent to my observation of your posting style.
Which is less practical or efficient than reading the entire thread as it currently exists before posting your contribution to it.
A consensus hardly ever develops from extended threads. So that point of yours is unfounded.
Reply to
Home Guy
But don't forget the heavy rubber gloves. While muriatic acid (which is largely hydrochloric acid) isn't wildly dangerous, it will take your skin off if you let it.
And also use goggles.
Joe Gwinn
Reply to
Joseph Gwinn
The MSDS says it's hydroxy acetic acid. It's been a looong time since organic chemistry, but I think the hydroxy part suggests that it's acetic acid (vinegar) that's been partially neutralized.
If any of you chemists are reading this, what's the significance of the hydroxy part of the description. I know it's an OH group, but how does it change the action of acetic acid?
RWL
Reply to
GeoLane at PTD dot NET
GeoLane at PTD dot NET fired this volley in news: snipped-for-privacy@4ax.com:
It's relatively a weak acid, although concentration counts. It's generally safe to make contact with skin in _very_ diluted form, although it will slowly dissolve the epidermis. It's better known as glycolic acid, and sometimes incorrectly as "fruit acid" when used in cosmetic chemical peels. It gets this moniker from being available naturally in some acid fruits (but not citrus), like pineapples.
It's not "partially neutralized acetic acid", but can be derived from acetic acid by first neutralizing it with an hydroxide, then re- acidifying the salt.
Most any acid you can buy will slowly dissolve concrete, even though it's not a carbonate, but primarily a sulfate. Muratic acid will do, and is probably a whole lot less expensive than glycolic acid. The most common "etch" for concrete is oxalic acid, but it's dangerous, poisonous, and pretty damaging to human tissue.
LLoyd
Reply to
Lloyd E. Sponenburgh
Vinegar should work nicely, no? If so, I will just remove the panels and put them into a bucket with vinegar.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus8962
Ignoramus8962 fired this volley in news:stmdnQg16o5tHXjTnZ2dnUVZ snipped-for-privacy@giganews.com:
yeah, but at 5% acidity, it'll take a long time.
A bottle of concentrated muratic acid, diluted in water (acid into the water, not the other way) to about 25% will work a LOT faster.
LLoyd
Reply to
Lloyd E. Sponenburgh
Yeahbut, do it outdoors and stay upwind of it.
Whoof!
--Winston
Reply to
Winston
Concentrated muriatic (hydrochloric) acid is about 37%. Pure HCl is a gas. Dealt with hydrochloric quite a bit at work. Aqueous isn't that bad, although it'll sting like a bitch if you have a cut. Worst mistake I made with hydrochloric was using chlorinated solvents on my back porch with an unvented water heater in the vicinity. Had to replace ALL the stainless wire rigging on my sailboat after exposure to the resulting fumes. Mast and boom were hung on the back porch.
Nitric and sulfuric are bad and will burn skin in an instant, concentrated sulfuric wants water so bad, it'll remove water from sugar, starches, or your hide, leaving the carbon. Hydrofluoric is worse, I don't want anywhere near that stuff, although it is found in some fluxes. Worse for eyes than the normal acids are alkaline materials like lye, or worse, ethanolamines.
Be careful out there.
Pete Keillor
Reply to
Pete Keillor

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