I need Pop Rivet information

Does anyone know of websites that offer primer or novice information for
using pop rivets? I have a cheap rivet tool which came with an assortment
of rivets. I've used it a few times, but I've got important projects to do
and I want to get the most out of it. I don't understand the application of
different metals for shanks, heads, as well as the proper head lengths etc.
If I knew more about using rivets, I would buy a better tool as well.
Thanks, Ivan
Reply to
Ivan
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Reply to
James P Crombie
On Mon, 8 Dec 2003 13:28:00 -0600, Ivan put forth the notion that...
I use pop rivets by the thousands for mounting the components in my phase converter panels. Harbor freight has a pneumatic rivet gun that they put on sale quite often. Once you've tried it, you'll never go back to any kind of mechanical rivet gun again. As for aluminum VS steel rivets, it doesn't really make any difference in my application. Both work equally well in the HF tool.
Reply to
Checkmate
google-izing Harbor Freight this evening....thanks. Ivan
application of
Reply to
Ivan
mcmaster.com is a good, cheap, no-nonsense place to buy pop rivets. Boxes of 500 for the cost of a hardware store bubble-pack. All sizes, styles and materials including the right back-up washers.
Bob
Reply to
Toolbert
See Carroll Smith's Nuts, Bolts, Fasteners, and Plumbing Handbook, which can be ordered from .
Reply to
Steve Dunbar
I'll second this suggestion... that book is worth its weight in gold, both for the diatribes on rivets and for the information about bolts and various other methods of holding things together. It will, however, make you want to start shopping at Aircraft Spruce, which can be a very pricey thing to do... you'll be installing some fine bolts and rivets, though!
Reply to
The Hurdy Gurdy Man
Probably not the easiest thing to find, but I use an old RAF training manual for aircraft fitters. As I do a lot of shopping in aircraft scrapyards anyway, it's very helpful.
-- Die Gotterspammerung - Junkmail of the Gods
Reply to
Andy Dingley
You don't say much about your requirements. What are you rivetting? How much stress on the joint?
There are blind rivets intended for aircraft construction that are _much_ stronger than hardware POP rivets.
Ted
Reply to
Ted Edwards
I forgot to mention: Ron Wanttaja, "Kitplane Construction" TAB Books (McGraw-Hill) ISBN 0-8306-3565-3(p) In library as TL671.2.W26 1990 or 629.134'2-dc20
Excellent reference on construction techniques including rivetting.
Ted
Reply to
Ted Edwards
Some years ago I bought quite a good manual rivet setter - KingClik I think, It came with several nozzle sizes, and also some rivet nuts along with the usual "Pop" rivets. The latter are easy enough to find in steel and alloy, but the brass threaded rivet nuts (and the threaded setting bar that is used with them - mine snapped early on) is a different thing. I never see them listed, and haven't a clue where to find them. Not being in "the trade", I'd only want small quantities, not thousands, but they were such useful things, while they lasted..
Dave (UK)
Reply to
spitfire2
RS
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There's a couple of different sorts, but the ones I use sound like the sort you've used. The tool is a Beargrip riveter body, with a threaded mandrel added. Only a little work for a lathe owner to make one.
-- Die Gotterspammerung - Junkmail of the Gods
Reply to
Andy Dingley
Depending on what you are riveting, there are different rivets. The regular pop rivet is a hollow rivet with a steel head behind in a long hollow tube. In other words there is nothing to hold the steel head tight to the material and the rivet part in the hole is hollow. For a better rivet, you can use the avex rivet which you can use the same rivet gun. The way the avex rivet is made, as you start squeezing, it expands and fills tight in the hole, the regular pop rivet does not expand in the hole. The way the avex rivet works it closes itself behing the steel head and it cannot fall out like the regular pop rivet. The steel head and part of the shank fills in the hole and it will not come loose like the regular pop rivet. These rivets are used in many kit airplanes but they can be purchased in many fasterner stores. They were originally designed in the UK for washers, dryers, stoves.
Eric
Reply to
Eric Comeau

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