Knurling brass

Have any of you seen a source for pre-knurled brass rod? Thinking 1/2"
or 5/8" in pieces ling enough that I can chuck up in my lathe, drill
the center, thread and part off to make knurled nuts? Or any of you
know a source of knurled nuts with 2BA threads? I'm not so hot at
knurling and was looking for a shortcut to cut my lathe time down
Reply to
Gerry
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Hey Gerry,
What kind of knurl(er) do you have? The "scissors" or "adjustable" type work very well and easily. For instance= = = =
Then pick KBC # and in the space above enter:
1-587X-1000
Take care.
Brian Lawson, Bothwell, Ontario. XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX >Have any of you seen a source for pre-knurled brass rod? Thinking 1/2" >or 5/8" in pieces ling enough that I can chuck up in my lathe, drill >the center, thread and part off to make knurled nuts? Or any of you >know a source of knurled nuts with 2BA threads? I'm not so hot at >knurling and was looking for a shortcut to cut my lathe time down
Reply to
Brian Lawson
Yep, that's the tool I have. I have yet to learn the proper way to set up and use it.I do OK but not good enough for my taste. FWIW, the position I'm using it is upside down to the picture in the catalog-the adjustment nut is on top. I have not learned the art of controlling my depth consistently from one piece to another or when to stop before the knurls start being too deep. Can you travel with that tool? Wheels should be at 12 and 6, right?
Reply to
Gerry
Gerry, here's how it always works for me using a "scissors" knurler. You will have to experiment to get the feel for this. The best knurls are the beveled type. Bring the knurls to touch the work at 12 & 6 (diametrically opposite) and square with the side. Lock the crossfeed. Move the saddle to go off the work. Adjust the knurler a small amount, run the spindle at lowest speed (~100 rpm or less). Now run knurler back onto the work slowly a bit then back off. Stop the lathe and look to see if both knurls are tracking. The trick is to have a fairly heavy feed the first try without overdoing it. This forces the knurls to track right away. If all is well, continue to the knurled length you need. If not, add more feed and try again. Do this off the work Now it's just a matter of adjusting to the depth you need. All this should be done in as few revolutions as possible. All the chips that flake off get mashed into the work, so brush them off as you go or stop and clean up. If the knurler tends to squirm side to side as you move, that's bad. Knurling should be the first operation, machining the rest to size last. RichD, Atlanta
Reply to
RichD
Keystone may have something premade that would suit - I think they call them thumbnuts.
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Reply to
Robbo
snip----
Rich, If the knurl is not free to move side to side, you'll have one hell of a time getting a knurl that isn't split unless you start with a perfect major diameter. The side movement is what corrects for the improper diameter of any given knurl by adjusting the overall length.
Harold
Reply to
Harold and Susan Vordos
Hey again Gerry,
Well, if you don't want the "adjustment nut" to point down, remove the tool holder part and reverse it. I don't recall having the do that with mine, but I do have the "nut" up where it is easy to get at.
(Note:) I also made a series of sleeves for the threaded rod that the nut is on, so I can drop the different sizes in to accommodate the size work to be knurled. That way, the "nut" is always at the "top" and I don't have to run it up and down. (2nd Note:) the "tool-holder" part on the KBC models are cranked so it can be sued on different size lathes. Check for best use on yours.
6 &12 o'clock is good, but position is more dependant on the situation and tool-post height. Just be sure the knurls are "opposite" one another on the work-piece, or you will have a problem.
And yes, it will travel OK. Hints and tips from RichD and Harold V. tell it too.
Take care.
Brian Lawson, Bothwell, Ontario. XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX
>Yep, that's the tool I have. I have yet to learn the proper way to set >up and use it.I do OK but not good enough for my taste. FWIW, the >position I'm using it is upside down to the picture in the catalog-the >adjustment nut is on top. I have not learned the art of controlling my >depth consistently from one piece to another or when to stop before >the knurls start being too deep. Can you travel with that tool? Wheels >should be at 12 and 6, right? > > > >>> Hey Gerry, >> >> What kind of knurl(er) do you have? The "scissors" or "adjustable" >> type work very well and easily. For instance= = = = >> >> >> >> Then pick KBC # and in the space above enter: >> >> 1-587X-1000 >> >> Take care. >> >> Brian Lawson, >> Bothwell, Ontario. >> XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX >> >> >> >Have any of you seen a source for pre-knurled brass rod? Thinking 1/2" >> >or 5/8" in pieces ling enough that I can chuck up in my lathe, drill >> >the center, thread and part off to make knurled nuts? Or any of you >> >know a source of knurled nuts with 2BA threads? I'm not so hot at >> >knurling and was looking for a shortcut to cut my lathe time down
Reply to
Brian Lawson
I'm using 300 rpm (about 20..30 mm diameter of work). Slow rpm only waste time. :-)
Not my impression.
I'm using coolant with a steady and thick stream to wash them off. *Not* oil! It only makes the chips adhere even more and you end in some nice but useless brass smudge.
When done, go over it with a wire brush. Makes a big difference.
Nick
Reply to
Nick Mueller
Harold, I was refering to the holder. It should not turn. When knurling and moving from side to side, a loose knurler will turn. That ruins the work. My knurler has the knurl wheels held in a close fitting slot. No sideways movement. The stock diameter is unimportant. I do this frequently. The precedure works every time. RichD
Reply to
RichD

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