Machinery-moving mattock (pry bar) -- new project page

This new page describes my mattock tool, a kind of pry bar for moving heavy machinery by hand:
http://www.truetex.com/mattock.htm

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May I suggest sharpening the tip of the tongue so it can be driven under an object setting on a floor. Your tool looks a little like the "bird's foot" tool I picked up from an abandonded railroad track several years go.
Paul
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Richard J Kinch wrote:

I've heard these called "Johnson bars". Interesting to see your take on it. Contrast with another rcm'er-made bar at http://www.dogpatch.com/bobp/shop/mover.htm
GWE
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Grant Erwin wrote:

This is what we called "Johnson Bars"
http://www.gilmorekramer.com/more_info/oak_hardwood_lever_dollies/oak_hardwood_lever_dollies.shtml
I once asked a grizzled old rigger why they were called "Johnson bars", he replied"Cuz if ya slip when you're using one, it jump right up and slaps ya in your Johnson". He then added, " The name Johnson bar sounds a whole lot better than "Nut Crusher".
I had to agree.
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Grant Erwin writes:

No, that's a different item in both design and function. The J-bar is designed to roll with minimum lift height. Mine is designed to stay put and lift high enough to get 1" roller-bars underneath.
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On Mon, 07 Feb 2005 18:49:37 -0600, Richard J Kinch

In Minnesota, land of many Johnsons, the Johnson bar is basicially a hooked bar lacking the Kinch improvement of the load-spreading roller. The degree of hook defines the range of lift. My J-bar has enough hook to lift a mill so pipes can be placed to roll it around.
Load-spreading roller is a good idea, but it's still line contact on the floor. Another approach is to use a load-spreading plate of 1/4 or thicker steel under the Jbar.
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Don Foreman writes:

Thus my suggestion to insert a cushion of hard polyethylene. This spreads the force well below concrete's compression strength. Or a sandwich including a steel plate; the principle is one of "impedance matching".
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heavy
I'm not surprised the handle stub bent. But I am surprised that those glommy welds didn't bust. Be careful under heavy loads, Richard. Even a drop of one inch on an old Cincy#2 will hurt you, the floor, or the machine!
BTW... many of the old machines had a recess here and there on the base skirt under which to get a purchase for prying. Even if you couldn't do it in one lift, you could get an edge up with a flattened pry bar, then shim it up until you got the big Johnson under it.
LLoyd
LLoyd
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I've used the Johnson type, wooden handled with 2 cast iron wheels. It's one of those very effective basic tool designs of yesteryear. I suppose the wheels help prevent slippage, in the way that wheels on a floor jack allow it to move as the load is lifted.
Maybe Johnson bar contributed to the expression A real man would lift that with his dick
WB .............

heavy
-
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