Made a "Forklift Scale" for the working poor

On Wed, 10 Apr 2013 10:26:15 -0500, Ignoramus3221


Have you considered marketing this as a product?
I've worked on a digital unit for a local manufacturer of this kind of system, but a strictly mechanical product could be good too (but it's not going to be tying into IT stuff).
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They sell digital forklift scales, that are essentially a display and a microprocessor. I do not see how I can bring something new to this market. My scale cost me very little, but it is not a product that I could market.

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On Apr 9, 10:58pm, Ignoramus26995 <ignoramus26...@NOSPAM. 26995.invalid> wrote: > 2. I figured out how to deal with errors caused by friction. It is

So how much difference is there between creeping up and down? Inquiring minds want to know.
Dan
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Friction depends on a lot of factors, such as load, how far the load is on the forks, weather (hot or cold) etc.
With a small weight of 2800 lbs, it was about 200 PSI difference.
When I lifted a forklift that weighed 12,000 lbs, it was more like 400 PSI.
i
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"Ignoramus3221" wrote in message

You probably already thought of this but you will need to subtract out for the pressure to lift the forks empty, maybe paint a weight on containers you might re-use for a scrap bin.
RogerN
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The scale to convert PSI to lbs, that I printed out, already has that weight subtracted.
i
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On Sun, 07 Apr 2013 09:06:41 -0500, Ignoramus32392

That may work for you but be very careful if it needs to be very accurate, Forklift manufactures don't do it because of liability worries of a forklift tipping over. You need to know your weight before it goes on the forks.
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It does not need to be very accurate. Plus or minus 200 lbs, or 3%, whichever is greater, is fine.

OK, you got me. If I do scrap metal, how exactly do I know the weight before it goes on the forks?
The scale is the way to find out the weight.
i
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On Sun, 07 Apr 2013 20:32:02 -0500, Ignoramus32392

I am in no way saying that it can't work, being in the industry forbids me to try because of liability issues. I do know that there is stuff out in the field to measure weight but its not cheap. If you can come up with something reliable then you may strike it rich, that is untill someone tips a forklift onto its face. I don't know what your data plate says about your forklifts capacity but would a portable scale work? Not trying to be negative but the fine for being over weight may be the least of your worries.
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There are forklift scales being sold by various outfits. Some are based on pressure sensors and some are built into carriages. Mettler Toledo makes them, and it is a respectable, well established company.
My own version is inferior in some ways, such as less convenient to use and less repeatable, but it cost me almost nothing. I had a pressure gauge that I removed from a big machine I scrapped recently, and a hose, I only had to pay for a tee fitting and size reducer.
I personally do not buy the story that forklift scales somehow make a forklift less safe. I also feel that the operator of the forklift should feel if he is overloaded or close to tipping over, by how the forklift behaves. And in that case, just keep the load close to the ground.
i
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